Seven Disappointing “Harry Potter” Film Changes

Past MuggleNet articles have already looked at how the films improved and did justice to scenes from the books, so now it’s time to look at several scenes the movies worsened. Below are the seven scenes I am most disappointed with.

 

  1. Voldemort and Harry’s final battle

 

Tom Riddle hit the floor with a mundane finality, his body feeble and shrunken, the white hands empty, the snakelike face vacant and unknowing” (Deathly Hallows 744).

Voldemort’s death in the films is one of my least favorite things about the cinematic adaptations. He and Harry fought alone, instead of being surrounded by everyone else, which meant that nobody cheered when Voldemort finally died. This change gave the triumphant moment a much darker feel. In addition, he was supposed to have a boring death. Voldemort’s “mundane” death proved that, despite everything he did, he was still human. The extraordinary movie death refuted this.

 

  1. Ron and Hermione’s first kiss

 

 

‘I mean we should tell them [the house-elves] to get out. We don’t want any more Dobbies, do we? We can’t order them to die for us —’

There was a clatter as the basilisk fangs cascaded out of Hermione’s arms. Running at Ron, she flung them around his neck and kissed him full on the mouth” (Deathly Hallows 625).

Ron’s change in attitude about the house-elves demonstrated how much he had grown over the series. He went from an immature child to a selfless hero. The moment when he thinks about the house-elves, something Hermione had been campaigning about for years, gave greater significance to their first kiss.

 

  1. Peter Pettigrew’s death

 

 

The silver tool that Voldemort had given his most cowardly servant had turned upon its disarmed and useless owner; Pettigrew was reaping his reward for his hesitation, his moment of pity; he was being strangled before their eyes” (Deathly Hallows 470).

Peter Pettigrew doesn’t seem to die in the films. Instead, he appears to have been stunned by Dobby, which is the last we see of him. His death, while complicated, demonstrates the destructive consequences of evil. Also, in the books, Peter’s hesitation in killing Harry repays the life debt he owed him.

 

  1. Tom Riddle’s backstory

 

 

We lost plenty of information about the Gaunts and the Horcruxes, which would have been both useful and informative. Instead, the films just glossed over the most important moments.

 

  1. Harry’s reveal

 

 

And he [Amycus] spat in her [McGonagall’s] face.

Harry pulled the Cloak off himself, raised his wand, and said, ‘You shouldn’t have done that.’
As Amycus spun around, Harry shouted, ‘Crucio!’” (Deathly Hallows 593).

I love how Harry showed himself in the books. Harry standing up for McGonagall displayed the respect and affection he felt for her. However, by changing his reveal to him publicly announcing himself, this heart-warming moment was lost.

 

  1. Nagini’s death

 

 

With a single stroke Neville sliced off the great snake’s head, which spun high into the air, gleaming in the light flooding from the entrance hall” (Deathly Hallows 733).

The final film spent several minutes where Ron and Hermione tried, and failed, to kill Nagini before Neville finally did. This seemed like a waste of time, and it prevented Neville from having his moment of glory in front of everyone else.

 

  1. Harry and Ginny’s first kiss

 

 

And without thinking, without planning it, without worrying about the fact that fifty people were watching, Harry kissed her” (Half-Blood Prince 533).

This public display of affection, on Harry’s part, finally reveals his feelings for Ginny. The conflicting emotions he had was one of the most relatable sub-plots of the penultimate novel. I found the film version rather awkward and uncomfortable because the relief and happiness, which were present in the books, never came through.

 

Do you agree with my list? Are there any other scenes you were disappointed with? Let us know in the comments!