Seven Times Fred and George Showed Us How to Deal with Problems

Fred and George Weasley are known for their many funny moments. They’re the tricksters, the ones to go to for a laugh, and we love them for it. However, this isn’t the only thing the Weasley twins are good for. In between all of their pranks, there’s actually a lot of wisdom to be found in their actions; they challenge authority and don’t take deadlines or setbacks too seriously. Here are seven times when the Weasley twins showed us how to deal with school, stress, and just generally crappy situations.

 

1. Quidditch

 

 

Starting off lightly, let’s look at how these boys react during minor setbacks. Although Fred and George are clearly quite competitive during Quidditch, especially when it comes to playing against Slytherin (I’m looking at you, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix), they never give blame where it isn’t due. When Harry falls off his broom and blows Gryffindor’s chances of becoming champion in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, they care more for Harry’s well-being than the outcome of the match, unlike some others… *cough* Oliver Wood.

 

2. The Yule Ball

 

 

Fred and George both show that the best way to deal with massive social events is to not worry about them. (After all, worrying means you suffer twice!) Instead, Fred flat-out asks Angelina out, all confidence and straightforwardness. Meanwhile, the only reference to George’s date to the Yule Ball is made when the twins joke about him taking Pigwidgeon. These twins don’t have time for all those fake social constructs.

 

3. Dark Magic

 

 

Whenever the threat of Dark Magic lurks over Hogwarts, the twins manage to ridicule it. They make fun of the suggestion that Harry is the Heir of Slytherin in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and even turn Voldemort’s name into a constipation joke to keep up morale (U-No-Poo). Nothing breaks the tension better than a bit of dark humor.

 

4. Umbridge

 

 

Of course, their epic escape from Hogwarts in Order of the Phoenix couldn’t be left out. With only months of their education to go, Fred and George decide enough is enough and quit school in true twin fashion. With fireworks that are a major disruption during Harry’s OWL examinations and portable swamps that create havoc for weeks, the twins let Umbridge know that they do not agree with her ways. After all, there’s no better way to undermine a regime than to ridicule it.

 

5. Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes

 

 

Not only do they show Umbridge what they think of her rules, but they also show the rest of the wizarding world that one can do just fine in life without graduating. They start a master joke shop and become successful businessmen without losing their funny edge. Who needs a diploma, anyway?

 

6. Potterwatch

 

 

While Harry, Ron, and Hermione are hiding and searching for Horcruxes, the rest of the wizarding world is left in doubt. This is where Fred steps in, with Lee Jordan by his side in the books and George in the movies. They record a pirate radio program and use humor to keep their listeners informed, telling them to stay calm and sensible. Information is key, and it keeps people and their hopes alive during this time of uncertainty.

 

7. Percy

 

 

When their older brother chooses his career over his family, the twins are, understandably, angry. However, when Percy realizes what he’s done and apologizes, they accept his apology.

‘I was a fool!’ Percy roared, so loudly that Lupin nearly dropped his photograph. ‘I was an idiot, I was a pompous prat, I was a – a -‘
‘Ministry-loving, family-disowning, power-hungry moron,’ said Fred.
Percy swallowed.
‘Yes, I was!’
‘Well, you can’t say fairer than that,’ said Fred, holding out his hand to Percy” (DH 664).

Fred clearly voices his opinion but also decides that forgiving Percy is more important than holding a grudge.

 

Clearly, the twins don’t shy away from their thoughts or dreams. They say what they think. They show that they’re confident in who they are, which makes it so much easier to handle problems.

What do you think? What is an important lesson that Fred and George taught you?