Category: Theater Reviews

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Theatre Review: “Privacy” Starring Daniel Radcliffe

Very little information is shared with theater-goers about “Privacy” before you enter the theater. We know it’s got something to do with technology and our relationship to it. We know we’ll be encouraged to leave our phones on during the performance. Most of the audience enters the Public Theater’s Newman Theater knowing nothing beyond these few facts. It was enough to get us to buy tickets, but does it guarantee an enjoyable night?

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Theater Review: “My Perfect Mind” at 59E59 in New York City

“My Perfect Mind,” co-written and directed by Kathryn Hunter (who portrayed Mrs. Figg in “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix”), is a playful—and at times bewildering but in the best kind of way—examination of an actor’s relationship to the part of King Lear, a role that a stroke prevented him from playing on the stage.

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Theater Review: “Good People”, starring Imelda Staunton

Staunton delivers a magnificent performance as Margie, her comic timing is impeccable, and she had the audience in the palm of her hands from the minute she stepped on to the stage. It is worth mentioning that the play is far from a predictable straightforward comedy, it contains many surprise twists along the way, which left the audience gasping at the performance I saw.

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Theater Review: “Just Jim Dale”

Though his Potter experience ultimately takes up less than 5 percent of the show’s narrative (though it included a fabulous anecdote about how he came up with the voice of Dobby) Jim’s retelling of the rest of his own life story is no less magical. He talks at length about his career as a singer/songwriter, for instance. Did you know Jim Dale had a brief stint as a British-teen singing-sensation?

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Theater Review: “Peddling”, starring and written by Harry Melling

The themes of rewind and repetition are threaded through Peddling, the writing début of Harry Melling, best known for his run as the unpleasant Dudley Dursley in the Harry Potter films. But you’ll find no hint of Dudley here; Melling has shed Dudley’s cartoonishly menacing bulk—literally and figuratively—and instead inhabits a complex, energetic homeless boy who makes his living by selling ‘everyday essentials’ door to door.