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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

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In the epic finale, the battle between the good and evil forces of the wizarding world escalates into an all-out war. The stakes have never been higher, and no one is safe. But it is Harry who may be called upon to make the ultimate sacrifice as he draws closer to the climactic showdown with Lord Voldemort. It all ends here.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 DVD synopsis

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Latest News

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Trailers & Clips

Trailers & Clips

Release Dates

Release Dates

North America

Puerto Rico - July 14, 2011
Canada
- July 15, 2011
Mexico
- July 15, 2011
Panama
- July 15, 2011
United States
– July 15, 2011

Europe

Austria - July 13, 2011
Azerbaijan
- July 13, 2011
Bosnia and Herzegovina
- July 13, 2011
Belgium
- July 13, 2011
Denmark
- July 13, 2011
Germany
- July 13, 2011
Finland
- July 13, 2011
France
- July 13, 2011
Iceland
- July 13, 2011
Italy
- July 13, 2011
Netherlands
- July 13, 2011
Norway
- July 13, 2011
Russia
- July 13, 2011
Serbia
- July 13, 2011
Sweden
- July 13, 2011
Ukraine
- July 13, 2011
Czech Republic
- July 14, 2011
Georgia
- July 14, 2011
Greece
- July 14, 2011
Croatia
- July 14, 2011
Portugal
- July 14, 2011
Slovenia
- July 14, 2011
Armenia
- July 15, 2011
Bulgaria
- July 15, 2011
Estonia
- July 15, 2011
Hungary
- July 15, 2011
Ireland
- July 15, 2011
Lithuania
– July 15, 2011
Romania
- July 15, 2011
Spain
- July 15, 2011

Asia

Kuwait – July 12, 2011
Israel – July 13, 2011
Kazakhstan – July 13, 2011
Turkey – July 13, 2011
Hong Kong – July 14, 2011
Malaysia – July 14, 2011
Taiwan – July 14, 2011
Thailand – July 14, 2011
India – July 15, 2011
Japan – July 15, 2011
Pakistan – July 22, 2011
Indonesia – July 29, 2011
China – August 4, 2011
Vietnam – February 3, 2012

South America

Argentina - July 14, 2011
Chile
- July 14, 2011
Peru
- July 14, 2011
Brazil – July 15, 2011
Columbia – July 15, 2011
Paraguay – July 15, 2011
Uruguay – July 15, 2011
Venezuela – July 15, 2011

Africa

Egypt – July 13, 2011
Zimbabwe – March 1, 2012

Oceania

Australia – July 13, 2011
New Zealand – July 14, 2011

Accolades

Accolades

  • Nominations
  • Awards

Academy Awards

Best Achievement in Makeup
Nick Dudman
Amanda Knight
Lisa Tomblin

Best Achievement in Visual Effects
Tim Burke
Greg Butler
John Richardson
David Vickery

Best Achievement in Art Direction
Stuart Craig
Stephenie McMillan

Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror Films

Best Supporting Actor
Ralph Fiennes

Best Supporting Actor
Alan Rickman

Best Supporting Actress
Emma Watson

Best Director
David Yates

Best Production Design
Stuart Craig

Best Editing
Mark Day

Best Special Effects
Tim Burke
Greg Butler
John Richardson
David Vickery

Best Costumes
Jany Temime

Best Make-Up
Nick Dudman
Amanda Knight

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Awards

Best Production Design
Stuart Craig
Stephenie McMillan

Best Sound
Mike Dowson
Stuart Hilliker
James Mather
Adam Scrivener
Stuart Wilson

Best Make Up & Hair
Amanda Knight
Lisa Tomblin

Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards

Best Art Direction
Stuart Craig
Stephenie McMillan

Best Visual Effects

Empire Awards

The Art of 3D

Best Female Newcomer
Bonnie Wright

Best Actor
Daniel Radcliffe

Golden Trailer Awards

Best Action TV Spot
Aspect Ratio
Warner Bros.
For “Every Journey”

Best Graphics in a TV Spot
Mojo Entertainment LLC
Warner Bros.
For “Triumphant Review”

Best Action Poster
Warner Bros.
For “Companion One Sheets

Grammy Awards

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
Alexandre Desplat

Hugo Awards

Best Dramatic Presentation – Long Form
Steve Kloves
David Yates

Kids’ Choice Awards

Favorite Movie Actor
Daniel Radcliffe

Favorite Move Actress
Emma Watson

Favorite Movie

MTV Movie Awards

Best Male Performance
Daniel Radcliffe

Best Kiss
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson

Best Movie

Best Fight
Ralph Fiennes
Daniel Radcliffe

Best Female Performance
Emma Watson

Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards

Best Production Design
Stuart Craig

Best Visual Effects

Best Stunts

San Diego Film Critics Society Awards

Best Screenplay, Adapted
Steve Kloves

Best Production Design
Stuart Craig

Satellite Awards

Best Original Score
Alexandre Desplat

Best Visual Effects
Tim Burke
Greg Butler
John Richardson
David Vickery

Best Sound (Editing & Mixing)
Mike Dowson
Stuart Hilliker
James Mather
Adam Scrivener
Stuart Wilson

SFX Awards

Best Director
David Yates

Visual Effects Society Awards

Outstanding Compositing in a Feature Motion Picture
Michele Benigna
Martin Ciastko
Thomas Dyg
Andy Robinson

Outstanding Animated Character in a Live Action Feature Motion Picture
Yasunobu Arahori
Tom Bracht
Gavin Harrison
Chris Lentz
For the character the Gringotts dragon

Outstanding Models in a Feature Motion Picture
Steve Godfrey
Pietro Ponti
Tania Richard
Andy Warren
For Hogwarts school buildings

Outstanding Visual Effects in a Visual Effects-Driven Feature Motion Picture
Tim Burke
Emma Norton
John Richardson
David Vickery

Outstanding Created Environment in a Live Action Feature Motion Picture
Keziah Bailey
Stephen Ellis
Clement Gerard
Pietro Ponti
For Hogwarts

Washington DC Area Film Critics Association Awards

Best Art Direction
Stuart Craig
Stephenie McMillan

Best Acting Ensemble

Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror Films

Best Fantasy Film

Art Directors Guild

Excellence in Production Design – Fantasy Film
Andrew Ackland-Snow (senior art director)
Martin Asbury (storyboard artist)
Denise Ball (draughtsman)
Thomas Ball (assistant graphics)
Mark Bartholomew (art director)
Rob Bliss (conceptual artist)
Adam Brockbank (conceptual artist)
Alastair Bullock (art director)
Jack Candy-Kemp (assistant scenic artist)
Paul Catling (conceptual artist)
Jane Clark (storyboard artist)
James Cornish (storyboard artist)
Stuart Craig (production designer)
Julia Dehoff (props draughtsman)
Peter Dorme (assistant art director)
Jordana Finkel (junior draughtsman)
Martin Foley (art director)
Stephen Forrest-Smith (storyboard artist)
Kate Grimble (art director)
Steve Hedinger (hod letter & decor artist)
Nicholas Henderson (art director)
Christian Huband (art director)
Molly Hughes (art director)
Clive Ingleton (letter & decor artist)
Matthew Kerly (junior draughtsman)
Ashley Lamont (junior draughtsman)
Neil Lamont (supervising art director)
Amanda Leggatt (junior draughtsman)
Eduardo Lima (graphic designer)
Elizabeth Loach (junior draughtsman)
Francis Martin (letter & decor artist)
Peter McKinstry (concept artist – props)
Stephenie McMillan (set decorator)
Miraphora Mina (prop concept artist)
Andrew Palmer (draughtsman)
Andrew Proctor (junior draughtsman)
Oliver Roberts (art director)
Nicholas Saunders (assistant graphics)
Tino Schaedler (art director – digital sets)
Alex Smith (draughtsman)
Molly Sole (junior draughtsman)
Hattie Storey (art director)
Lottie Sveaas (junior draughtsman)
Stephen Swain (art director)
Ed Symon (junior draughtsman)
Gary Tomkins (art director)
Sloane U’Ren (art director)
Emma Vane (draughtsman)
Ketan Waikar (junior draughtsman)
Lauren Wakefield (assistant graphics)
Matthew Walker (scenic artist)
Marcus Williams (hod scenic artist)
Andrew Williamson (conceptual artist)
Ashley Winter (assistant art director)

British Academy of Film and Television (BAFTA) Awards

Best Special Visual Effects
Tim Burke
Greg Butler
John Richardson
David Vickery

Best Feature Film
David Barron
David Heyman
J.K. Rowling
David Yates

Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards

Best Sound

Best Makeup
Nick Dudman
Amanda Knight
Warner Bros.

Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) Film & TV Awards

Film Music
Alexandre Desplat

Costume Designers Guild Awards

Excellence in Fantasy Film
Jany Temime

Empire Awards

Best Director
David Yates

Best Film

Evening Standard British Film Awards

Blockbuster of the Year

Hollywood Film Festival

Hollywood Movie Award

MTV Movie Awards

Best Hero
Daniel Radcliffe

Best Cast

People’s Choice Awards

Favorite Movie

Favorite Action Movie

Favorite Book Adaptation

Favorite Ensemble Movie Cast
Rupert Grint
Daniel Radcliffe
Emma Watson
Warner Bros.

Rembrandt Awards

Best International Film

San Diego Film Critics Society Awards

Best Score
Alexandre Desplat

Best Ensemble Performance

Screen Actors Guild Awards

Outstanding Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
Bobby Holland Hanton
Ryan Stuart

Outstanding Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
Nick McKinless

SFX Awards

Best Film

Teen Choice Awards

Choice Movie: Fight
Ralph Fiennes
Daniel Radcliffe

Choice Summer Movie

Choice Summer Movie Star: Male
Daniel Radcliffe

Choice Summer Movie Star: Female
Emma Watson

Mistakes

Mistakes

  • Wrong prophecy – While Harry is in Snape’s memories, a scene from the book is presented. It is when Snape is still a Death Eater and listens secretly to the prophecy made by Trelawney. However, what is shown in Snape’s memory is her making a different prophecy, the one made by her in Prisoner of Azkaban.
  • Insta-dry – When Harry and the characters are in Gringotts, they go through a waterfall. After they have fallen out of the cart, Hermione gets up, wet, but the next time you see her she is dry (her skin and clothes don’t reflect light as much as they did in the previous shot). Then in the next shot, she is wet again.
  • Lost your sleeves – When the trio change clothes after jumping into the lake, Harry puts on a long sleeved shirt that is gray with a dark collar. Later, in the “limbo” scene, he is shown wearing the same gray shirt with dark collar but with short sleeves.
  • Transfigured clothing – In one of Snape’s flashbacks, he is holding Lily’s dead body and she is wearing a light blue button up shirt. In versions of the same scene in previous movies, she is wearing a black turtleneck.
  • Moving pillow – The pillow behind Griphook changes position during the Shell Cottage scene.
  • Golden camera – Just after Harry has seen Snape’s memories in the Pensieve, he turns and sits down on the step, and the camera can be seen reflected in the gold on the wall behind him.
  • Mirrored crew – When Harry is visiting Dobby’s grave, the camera and camera guy can be seen in the mirror that Harry holds before he puts it down on grave.
  • Zombie insects – When Bathilda Bagshot meets Hermione and Harry, flies can be heard buzzing. Since it is mid-winter and – judging by the light snow – the temperature is quite a lot below freezing, no insects could be active.
  • Major mistake – In every film a huge deal is made over the fact that Harry has his mother’s eyes. While Geraldine Sommerville, who plays older Lily Potter does have blue eyes like Daniel Radcliffe, Ellie Darcey-Alden, who plays young Lily, has brown eyes.
  • You have a nose! – In the final battle, Ralph Fiennes’s nose is briefly visible instead of Voldemort’s characteristic snake nose look.
  • Light night – Neville says, “We lost Harry tonight,” but it is clearly morning by this time. He should have said “… last night.”
  • Apparating Ginny – When Bellatrix casts her spell at Ginny in the Great Hall near the end of the film, Ginny is standing in front of her family. However, when Molly Weasley comes forward to attack Bellatrix, Ginny is suddenly behind her father and brothers.
  • Where are we? – At the end of the film when Harry takes his son to board the Hogwarts Express at King’s Cross, an exterior shot of St. Pancras Station is used because St. Pancras is a more photogenic building than King’s Cross.
  • Easy catch – The first spell Molly Weasley fires at Bellatrix Lestrange is exactly the same as the second one she fires at Bellatrix (after Bellatrix attacks her and laughs). They re-used the same shot. The only difference is the color of the spell.
  • Spying Snape – One of Snape’s memories shows Lily telling baby Harry to be safe, be strong. That had to have occurred before Voldemort killed Lily. Snape was not in the house until after Lily was killed and Voldemort was gone. Only Lily and Harry should have had that memory, not Snape.
  • Transfigured clothing… again – When Voldemort kills Lily, she is wearing a red turtleneck sweater. When Snape comes in the room and sees Lily dead on the floor, she is wearing a blue blouse.
  • Where’d you come from? – Immediately after the confrontation between Harry/McGonagall and Snape in the Great Hall, Harry runs up to Ravenclaw Tower against crowds of students running the opposite direction. However, all the students would have been in the Great Hall during that confrontation and therefore would have been coming from the same direction as Harry.
  • Nothing there – Harry’s Invisibility Cloak can always be seen until it is worn. In Diagon Alley, just before the Gringotts break-in, Ron pulls out the cloak to cover Harry and Griphook, but it turns invisible before he puts it on them. Ron merely mimes the motion of covering them.
  • Hiding in the shadows – During the main Harry and Voldemort duel in the courtyard, there is an aerial shot with Voldemort on the left and Harry on the right. Between them, in one of the arches of the alley, a cameraman in black is visible for about one second.
  • Bad hair day – When Harry, Ron, Hermione, and Neville are in the Room of Requirement talking to Ginny, Harry’s bangs keep changing style between shots.
  • Bad facial hair day – When Harry arrives in Hogsmeade and meets Aberforth Dumbledore, his stubble disappears in one shot and then reappears later in the same scene.
  • Injured or not? – Just after Harry and Voldemort have their altercation in the Forbidden Forest, Neville is seen walking into the Hogwarts courtyard to pick up the sorting hat. In the first shot, there is a camera angle of him from the waist down from behind, and he is stepping over the rubble and having no trouble walking. In the very next shot, you get a full frontal view of him walking, and he is limping and can barely move.
  • Missing robe – When the students enter the Great Hall, Ginny is seen among them in full uniform. However, when Padma begins screaming, the former can be seen in the casual clothing that she was wearing earlier in the Room of Requirement.
  • Hunting blind – In the scene where Harry is in the Room of Requirement, at several points during this scene, you can tell by the way the light shines that Harry’s glasses are missing their lenses, especially in close-up shots of Harry.
  • Grave robber – Dobby’s grave at the beginning of the movie has been moved further to the right of where it is was dug by Harry at the end of the Deathly Hallows – Part 1.
  • Dancing wand – During the final battle between Harry and Voldemort, Harry disarms Voldemort, and his wand spins out of his hand counter-clockwise. It then cuts to the wand spinning toward Harry clockwise.
  • Rolling Snily – During the flashback to young Lily and Severus, while they are lying under a tree, their positions change, specifically the distance between them.
  • Don’t looks back – When Ron is about to cast a spell to in an attempt to protect him and Hermione from Nagini, the view of him pointing his wand starts out from behind him and Hermione. Before the shot changes we see Hermione turn her head toward Ron. When the shot changes to face them, Hermione is looking at the snake and then turns her head again.
  • Apparating Nagini – When Nagini (the snake) is moving down the stairs to attack Ron and Hermione, it lunges from midway down the stairs, under the archway. After intercutting a shot of the duel between Voldemort and Harry, Nagini is lunging from the ground, far away from the staircase and the archway.
  • Hairy Dumbledore – In the “limbo” scene at King’s Cross when Harry is speaking to Dumbledore, Dumbledore’s hair changes frequently. It is covering part of his beard, then is back behind his ear, then is hanging neatly down.
  • Musical chairs – After arriving in Hogsmeade, when Harry is talking to Aberforth Dumbledore, the table by the window has two chairs on one side of the table. A few minutes later, there’s only one chair on that side, and the other chair is now at the end where there was previously none at all.
  • Good Mrs. Norris – When Filch is holding Mrs. Norris the cat’s eyes are not red, but in all the other films they are.
  • Killed by nothing – When the Killing Curse rebounds and hits Voldemort, you can’t see the curse even coming within a foot of him or his wand.
  • Apparating Neville – When the Snatchers run out of the forest toward the covered bridge, Neville is standing in the bridge’s center, but when the three Snatchers are killed by the shield, Neville is now standing at the bridge’s entrance.
  • Apparating Alecto – When Snape redirects Professor McGonagall’s spell to Alecto Carrow, she falls on the lower platform. But after the camera angle changes, she is lying on the second platform with her brother Amycus.
  • Invisible light – In the final scene when Harry and Voldemort “connect” their wands, there is a close-up of Harry’s face. Although the only light source seems to be the ball of fire between him and Voldemort, Harry’s face is lit from his left.

Information courtesy of IMDb and Movie Mistakes.

Trivia

Trivia

  • The fight scene between Dame Maggie Smith and Alan Rickman was filmed when Smith was 76 years old, which makes her the oldest actress to have a fight scene in a movie.
  • In every shot in which Voldemort and Bellatrix Lestrange appear together, she always moves so that she stands on his right, traditionally the position of the most loyal and trusted follower.
  • Molly Weasley’s line “Not my daughter, you bitch!” is Julie Walters’ favorite line throughout her career.
  • The fight between McGonagall and Snape was considered to be changed into Harry and Snape instead. The idea was scrapped by J.K. Rowling, who insisted that the duel should involve the same characters as them in the novel since she saw it as a key moment for Dame Maggie Smith’s character.
  • When Harry revealed that he was still alive in the Hogwarts courtyard, Draco was meant to initially break ranks with the Death Eaters and throw Harry his wand. The scene was filmed but not included in the final edit.
  • Daniel Radcliffe reportedly broke 80 wands throughout the series because he used them as drumsticks.
  • This is only film in the series where Hermione actually flies on a broom.
  • According to J.K. Rowling, the Battle of Hogwarts was fought on May 2, 1998. Victoire Weasley (Bill and Fleur’s eldest daughter) seen at the background in the epilogue has the same birth date, two years later, her name meaning “victory” in French.
  • 210,000 coins were made for the scene inside the vault at Gringotts.
  • Most of the events in this film – from the raid on Gringotts to the Battle of Hogwarts – take place over the course of a single day.
  • Robbie Coltrane, Warwick Davis, Rupert Grint, Tom Felton, Josh Herdman, Matthew Lewis, Devon Murray, James Phelps, Oliver Phelps, Daniel Radcliffe, Alan Rickman, Geraldine Somerville, Bonnie Wright, and Emma Watson are the only actors to have appeared in all eight movies.
  • Harry’s lightning bolt scar was applied by make-up teams approximately 5,800 times by the end of the series. Daniel Radcliffe had the scar applied 2,000 times while the rest were applied to stunt doubles and stand-ins.
  • Kate Winslet was first considered for and reportedly offered the role of Helena Ravenclaw. The role was rejected by her agent before she was able to consider it, believing that Winslet would not want to “follow suit with every other actor in Britain by being a part of Harry Potter.” The role subsequently went to Kelly Macdonald.
  • When Harry goes into the Room of Requirement, in the bottom left hand corner there is the horse that Ron rides in the ginat chess game in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001).
  • In total, Daniel Radcliffe went through 160 pairs of prop glasses by the end of the series.
  • Over 25,000 items of clothing and costuming have been used in the Harry Potter franchise.
  • Every wand seen in any film in the franchise was created on-site. Taking the lead from descriptions in the books, each wand was 13-15 inches long and created specifically for each character. No two wands were alike.
  • The Triwizard cloak that Harry wears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005) with “POTTER” printed on the back can be seen in the background during some of the boathouse scenes.
  • It had been reported that, due to her commitment to Nanny McPhee Returns (2010), Emma Thompson would be unable to appear in the Deathly Hallows films. However, she was able to return shortly before the end of filming to once again play Professor Trelawney. She joins her real-life sister Sophie Thompson, as well as her Nanny McPhee castmates Dame Maggie Smith, Rhys Ifans, and Ralph Fiennes.
  • It was reported that a huge blaze wrecked the Hogwarts set after a battle scene went spectacularly wrong. According to the report, explosives used in action sequences set light to scenery for the wizardry schoo, and firefighters battled for 40 minutes to bring the flames under control, but the set – centerpiece for the film’s Battle of Hogwarts climax – was left badly damaged. It was later confirmed that the fire was greatly exaggerated and that the set that had been damaged was going to need be rebuilt anyway for use in another scene. Some actors were still filming at the studio, but no one was injured.
  • David Yates said that the epilogue was re-shot because the heavy makeup originally applied on the actors at adult age didn’t reflect well in the dailies.
  • This is the only entry in the series not to feature an arrangement of John Williams’s “Hedwig’s Theme” playing over either the Warner Bros. logo or the title at the beginning of the film. The theme is, however, used several times throughout the rest of the movie, including an extended performance at the beginning of the end credits.
  • Kelly Macdonald was the last person cast in the series.
  • When David Heyman was asked if there were any actors that he wished had been in the series but never were, he answered Eileen Atkins, Daniel Craig, Daniel Day-Lewis, Anne-Marie Duff, James McAvoy, and Ian McKellen. He now wishes to work with them in future projects. Daniel Radcliffe would have loved to see Judi Dench, Stephen Fry, and Helen Mirren.
  • Five 29-ton trucks-worth of polystyrene rubble were used to create scenes of destruction throughout the film.
  • Upon release, it set the record of the highest grossing opening weekend ever, with $169.2 million (previously held by The Dark Knight (2008), which earned $158.4 million in its opening weekend).
  • An estimated average of 5000 feet of film were shot and printed for each production day.
  • This film is the only Harry Potter film to be released in 3D in cinemas in its entirety (only select scenes were available for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007) and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009) and only in IMAX).
  • Not long after Alan Rickman started to play Severus Snape, J.K. Rowling told him some character secrets about Snape that would not be otherwise revealed until the last book. Most significantly, Rickman was one of the very few people other than Rowling to know (years ahead of the last book’s publication) that Snape had been in love with Lily Evans (later Potter) when they were students at Hogwarts, and both Snape’s protection of and antagonism toward Harry came from that. Rowling said that she shared this information with Rickman because “he needed to understand, I think, and does completely understand and did completely understand where this bitterness towards this boy, who’s living proof of [Lily's] preference for another man, came from.” According to Rickman, the directors prior to the publication of the last book were not privy to the information of Snape’s true character either, and he had to ask them to defer to him on the portrayal of Snape, whether or not they understood why.
  • Some time before the final book was published, Daniel Radcliffe asked writer J.K. Rowling whether his character Harry would die at the end. After a silence, Rowling gave him the very cryptic answer: “You get a death scene.”
  • The filmmakers persuaded Tom Felton to convince his girlfriend, Jade Gordon, to play Draco Malfoy’s wife, Astoria Greengrass, in the film’s epilogue.
  • This is the only Harry Potter movie in which Harry himself does not deliver the final line (his son Albus Severus Potter does instead).
  • Both Emma Watson and Rupert Grint have stated in several separate interviews that filming their much-awaited on-screen kiss was an “absolutely horrible” experience due to Emma’s admission of Rupert being “like a brother.” It took only six takes to complete, whereas the kiss between Harry and Ginny took around ten, Ron and Lavender approximately fifteen, and Harry and Cho over 30, by comparison.
  • Although all of the films except Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001) have had a customized version of the Warner Bros. logo, this one has a scene (a replay from the previous film of Voldemort robbing Dumbledore’s grave) before the studio logo – the first time this has been done for a studio-made Hollywood film in over 75 years.
  • Other than Harry causing Voldemort’s spell to backfire, the only good character depicted directly killing a Death Eater (in this case, Bellatrix) is Molly Weasley.
  • The script was originally written, like the book, to include Draco Malfoy’s bully friends, Crabbe and Goyle. As in the book, Crabbe was to be killed in a climactic battle. Jamie Waylett’s arrest and conviction on drug charges, however, forced the filmmakers to change this plan. Crabbe was written out of the script, with Goyle being killed in his place. Another Slytherin character, Blaise Zabini (portrayed by Louis Cordice), takes Goyle’s place from the book.
  • In the book, Snape’s (Alan Rickman) death originally takes place at the Shrieking Shack, but art directors suggested and moved the location (with J.K. Rowling’s agreement) to the boathouse in order to make it more dramatic and poignant. One of the art directors, Andrew Ackland-Snow, added, “We wanted to get him out from not a conventional interior but from that kind of box, to do it in a more dramatic atmosphere.”

Information courtesy of IMDb.

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