MuggleCast 214 Transcript (continued)



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Cafe Attack


Andrew: So, the trio get the heck out of there and then suddenly they are in London. And I thought this was good, the transfer, the Apparating to London. And they, of course, land right in front of a double decker bus, so they move out of the way very quickly. And then Hermione gets them into new clothes and they go into the cafe where there is a Snatcher attack. And I thought that was funny because the waitress...

[Eric laughs]

Andrew: ...is completely oblivious to what's going on until she walks out...

Micah: Yeah, that was good.

Andrew: ...and - was it Hermione who says "Leave!" or was it Harry?

Micah and

Richard: Hermione.

Eric: Yeah, it was Hermione.

Andrew: Hermione. "Leave!" [laughs]

Eric: Yeah.

Micah: Well, and this was the first instance where the taboo was used...

Eric: Yeah.

Micah: ...but they don't realize it. And I thought again they didn't really explain this at all in the film. Not sure that they had to, but I think it would have been - it would have made more sense for people to figure that out because then you could go back to the different moments in the film that they said the name "Voldemort," and all of a sudden these Snatchers showed up.

Eric: Yeah. I mean, Harry is shown saying "You Know Who" in one scene and it seems almost - it was jarring that he says "You Know Who" and we aren't explained why he just doesn't say "Voldemort."

Richard: I picked up on that as well and I almost wondered why. I mean, what was the point of it? I guess because they didn't really want to explain the whole taboo thing.

Andrew: [laughs] Yeah.

Eric: Well, later - okay, when Lovegood says it, when Xeno says it, obviously that's the moment when they come. But you're wondering if - because there was also that crow that was flying away from the place to start The Three Brothers scene...

Micah: Yeah.

Eric: ...so we're wondering if he sent a letter, though.

Micah: Right.

Eric: But then when he says "Voldemort" is when they actually show up, so it's kind of - but it's still not explained and like I said, Harry does say "You Know Who" in one scene he's talking to Hermione. You can use the name freely with Hermione, but he doesn't and it's not explained.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Grimmauld Place


Andrew: The trio then goes to Grimmauld Place and they see the Dumbledore sand/ghost figure thing, and that wasn't explained too much. It was sort of just like, oh, it was probably put in place for Snape.

Eric: Mhm.

Andrew: But it's like - any viewer would just think, "Well, if Snape saw that, wouldn't he just stand there and scream like Hermione did?" [laughs]

Richard: I thought that was quite terrifying, though. That whole scene was one of the scariest in the entire film.

Andrew: It was. And then they're sort of searching around the house and we see Kreacher. And Kreacher looked good and he sounded good, and I think he didn't change too much from Order of the Phoenix in terms of visual appearance and I liked him. Any comments about Grimmauld Place?

Micah: Yeah...

Andrew: This part of Grimmauld Place?

Micah: I think this moved really fast. This whole part - figuring out who R.A.B. was, sending Kreacher after Mundungus, finding out where the locket was, and then getting to the Ministry. It was very fast-paced, so I wonder if non-fans of the books are going to get completely lost in terms of what's going on here because it did move very quickly.

Eric: It did. There was a lot of kind of story elements that were just thrown in there.

Micah: Yeah.

Eric: Like them rereading the locket for instance.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Ministry of Magic


Andrew: They then head to the Ministry of Magic and they turn into the Ministry members. This was pretty funny because the way that these other actors portrayed Harry, Ron, and Hermione, in terms of their walk, their talk, their 'isms,' they were very well done. And I think at the junket interviews or somewhere, one of the billion interviews that have been online in the past few weeks, the trio said that they would first act out the scenes and then these Ministry of Magic actors would then mimic them.

Micah: Yeah.

Andrew: So, the trio was there, too, filming alongside and I thought that was a cool idea.

Eric: Yeah.

Micah: I'm going to go out on a limb. I'm going to say that this was some of the best acting in the entire film.

[Andrew laughs]

Richard: I agree. Yeah, I agree.

Andrew: Really? Why?

Eric: Was done by the strangers?

Micah: Yeah.

Andrew: Why do you like it, Richard?

Richard: Well to be honest, in the entire film I kind of thought Daniel Radcliffe's acting was really wooden in a lot of scenes. I mean, he has improved a lot as the films have gone on, but sometimes he comes across as very, very fake and very dense and very uninspiring. And I thought that these scenes in particular, [laughs] I thought they came alive more mostly because he wasn't in them and...

[Andrew laughs]

Eric: Wow! Tell us how you really feel.

Andrew: Go ahead, go on. No, stand by your opinion. Go ahead.

Richard: Well, I just thought - there is a nice sort of irony to that, is that I thought...

[Andrew laughs]

Richard: That was my favorite scene in the entire film - was the Ministry. And I thought...

Micah: Yeah.

Eric: In a Harry Potter film.

Richard: Yeah, I know! Exactly, there's an irony to that. But I just thought that those actors delivered a more credible performance than Dan can give.

Eric: Well, he's got a few years. [laughs]

Micah: Just to throw it out there, Runcorn was David O'Hara, Mafalda Hopkirk was Sophie Thompson, who is the sister, I think, of Emma Thompson, right?

Richard: Yeah.

Eric: Wow.

Micah: And...

Richard: They were brilliant though.

Micah: Reg Cattermole was played by Steffan Rhodri. So...

Eric: Yeah, I think Reg was my favorite.

Micah: ...put them up for Academy Awards.

Eric: Yeah.

[Andrew laughs]

Richard: I think all three were just brilliant.

Andrew: They were good, yeah. So, they get into the court room. And when they're going around the Ministry, that was very funny. I mean, going into the elevators, running into Umbridge. Imelda Staunton was as great as ever, I thought.

[Micah laughs]

Richard: Yeah.

Eric: She does the laugh. She does the laugh.

Micah: She's awesome. But can I...

Eric: Well...

Micah: Can I throw one thing out there though? You talked about going around the Ministry, the fact that Harry didn't take the eye off the door, of Mad Eye?

Andrew: Oh, yeah.

Micah: Such an easy thing to do that they left out and...

Eric: Yeah.

Micah: ...there's no reflection at all from Harry in that scene. When he saw it, he should have reacted a little bit better, I thought.

Eric: Yeah, it's kind of one of those things where they're expecting the audience to recognize it, but it gets no pay. Like the mirror scene, they're at - Harry is in Sirius's room and still he has this mirror whose origins are unexplained. It's never explained how he got the mirror. He picks it up at the very beginning of the film when he is in his bedroom at Privet Drive, and later on in the film we see him in Sirius's bedroom. He could have picked up the mirror at that point in the film, and they just didn't do it. Missed opportunity, or what was going on?

Andrew: Yeah. Well, speaking of the mirror, I was very disappointed with that whole thing because there is no introduction for the mirror, either. You just see Harry looking at it and suddenly you see what some would probably figure out to be Dumbledore's eye, but it's not even Dumbledore's, it's Aberfoth Dumbledore's, and there is just no explanation. And I counted - he picks it up three or four times...

Eric: Yeah.

Andrew: ...in this movie.

Eric: Well, we did have a pretty lengthy discussion on MuggleCast about this. I think it was last episode where you guys were asking me about this and I want to get your thoughts on that, but I also want to stick to the points here, quickly.

Andrew: Yeah, let's - well, we can...

Eric: Yeah. But when they flush themselves in - okay, when public servants have to flush...

[Andrew and Micah laugh]

Eric: ...themselves in to work...

Micah: That was funny.

Eric: It's the best. It's the best ever. I just loved that.

Andrew: That was good. So, when they get down into the courtroom, Umbridge is there and like Eric mentioned earlier, the Patronus keeping the Dementors at bay. That was really - that was pretty well done and it was nice to see Umbridge's Patronus, which of course was the kitty cat.

Eric: Did you guys notice the music notes emanating from the cat? There was the Patronus and then there's these little music staff notes like...

Andrew: Maybe.

Eric: ...you would normally see - that's what was coming...

Andrew: That seems to ring a bell.

Eric: It was coming from the cat and floating up to the barrier to prevent the barrier - so the cat was singing or something. It was really interesting.

Andrew: And this was one of my favorite parts of the movie I think, actually, when Harry slowly starts walking up to Umbridge and Umbridge says, "What are you doing?" And Harry throws the spell at her...

Eric: And he's transforming...

Andrew: ...and then all hell breaks loose.

Eric: ...as it happens.

Andrew: Yeah, exactly, exactly. [laughs] And now what did you guys think - this is, of course, a change from the book. What did you guys think of when Ron is transforming back into himself mid-kiss? For a theater, I guess, it's very funny. It's very, "Oh haha, of course he transforms back mid-kiss." That's not in the book, though. Did you guys like that?

Richard: Yeah...

Eric: I think...

Richard: ...it was all right.

Eric: ...it was an effort...

Micah: It was funny.

Eric: Yeah, to diffuse the tension, too, because this poor Mary character has gone through...

Andrew: [laughs] Yeah.

Eric: ...so much. So much, really. And everybody in the Ministry is wearing red bands, like they are the S.S. It's this really heavy allegory of people being persecuted and the fact that - the look on Mary's face when she kisses Ron and then, of course, the real Reg just walks into work at that moment. It's just this - the look on her face. She is terrified, she doesn't know what to say.

Micah: Well, I think it's supposed to show Ron's development as a character too, though...

Eric: Yes.

Micah: ...when he says to her, "Take the kids and go."

Eric: "Take the kids," yeah.

Micah: You're supposed to see a different side of Ron that you haven't seen up until this point. And Andrew what you mentioned - I also liked the tie back to Order of the Phoenix when Harry says to Umbridge, "You shall not tell lies."

Eric: Ahhh.

Richard: Yeah, I liked that.

Andrew: Yeah, that was good. That was good.

Richard: The only thing I didn't like about the Ministry-whole scenes - and this is kind of a petty thing to argue about - is that I always felt that they're starting to lose a touch of the magic to it. You notice that no one was really wearing wizarding robes any longer. Security guards were dressed like regular cops or whatever. And I was kind of expecting to see people dressed as wizards, not as Muggles in the Ministry of Magic.

Eric: That's a fair point. Yeah, I agree. I would agree to an extent. I would say - again it's kind of Nazi Germany, so everybody is wearing the same thing and it's not going to be extravagant. It's going to be dull tones, dull outfits sort of thing, and everybody alike - uniformity. That's what I would argue.

Micah: What did you guys think of Yaxley? He was in Malfoy Manor, but he was also in this particular scene. He reminded me...

Andrew: I loved him.

Richard: I thought he was brilliant.

Micah: ...of an Italian mobster.

[Eric laughs]

Andrew: Yeah. I thought he got the anger across great.

Eric: [imitating Yaxley] "It's still raining in my office."

Andrew: I mean, you can just see his anger when he starts chasing after Harry, Ron and Hermione. And those scenes, by the way, were great too, where Harry, Ron and Hermione are running towards the fireplace to get out of the Ministry. And there was sort of a slowish - or a shot that sort of slowed down, and you see Ron running and then his mouth is gaping open, like, ahh!

[Everyone laughs]

Eric: And then he - yeah.

Andrew: And that transition, too, was great. I thought...

Micah: Yeah.

Andrew: ...when they get in the fireplace and it sort of - you see the roots of the trees and then they see the silhouettes of the trees. And then they sort of just come up and then they are on the road.

Eric: Well, the silence of the music - just the soundtrack is dead and you see these trees and you know something is wrong way before you see Ron Splinched.

Micah: Yeah. And Yaxley, I think - he's almost like a horror-movie character, like a Michael Myers. He's slowly stalking them. He doesn't start to run after them until he absolutely needs to. It's kind of like a slow gait to catch them like he almost knows that eventually he's going to get his hands on them.

Eric: Yeah. He's such a - he's a good actor too. Again with finding the Polyjuiced trio actors and Yaxley, all these new actors - new adult actors, there were still some left in Britain apparently because they...

[Andrew laughs]

Eric: ...cast them in this film and they were awesome.

Micah: Yeah, I agree.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Camping in the Forest


Andrew: So, now they're on the road and this is the thing that they had been promoting a lot where it's going to be a road movie. They're going to be on the road, living on their own. And these scenes in particular were unique in that it's just these three and they sort of - they have to hold the scenes up on their own because in the past, they're surrounded by these great British actors or fellow Hogwarts students. For this part of the movie it's just these three, and I have to be honest and say I thought this is where the movie drags a bit.

Micah: Yeah, absolutely.

Richard: Yeah.

Andrew: Most people felt that way with the book, I think. There's still a lot of information being shared around the trio and of course, there's the big fight and the destroying of the Horcrux and Godric's Hollow. But it still felt like it dragged. Micah, why did you think it dragged?

Micah: I think it goes back to what I said earlier. The lack of development that took place prior to this film of Voldemort's threat to the Muggle world, and just why they would have to be on the run and maybe why the Muggle world is a bit safer than being in the wizarding world. Why not just go back under the protection of the Order of the Phoenix? Why are they on the run going to all these different places around England? It doesn't make a whole lot of sense and I...

Eric: Well...

Micah: Go ahead.

Eric: It's not only - they have a job to do, let's not forget. So, they're on the run just out of convenience because they need to find Horcruxes and that's really why they are in the woods to begin with. It's - they're only in the woods essentially because Hermione had to escape from the Ministry, needed a place to go immediately after finding the Horcrux. And they stay in the woods because their job there isn't finished, they need to figure out how to destroy the Horcrux. One of the earliest scenes in the woods is them trying to destroy the locket with all sorts of spells. They are unsuccessful and thus begins sort of the trek. It's not only they're in the woods because they're hiding from Voldemort. They need the time and the place...

Micah: Yeah.

Eric: ...and the space to be able to develop the end of Voldemort. So, it's the plot, it's the main beef of the film. I feel like if you feel it drags here, then you're more inclined to dislike the whole film.

Andrew: Richard, did you feel it dragged or were you a fan of these scenes?

Richard: I felt it dragged, but as I said earlier, I thought Emma Watson held this whole section of the film together. I thought - and Rupert Grint was very good as well but you really got the most from Emma, particularly when Ron stormed off and she had to choose whether she helped Harry or she goes with Ron. And you could see the tears in her eyes and you believed it, and that - I thought she was sort of the shining beacon in that whole section of the movie, which otherwise I thought was kind of dull and prolonged.

Micah: Yeah, I think Ron summed it up the best when he had the locket around his neck and he was clearly angry about the lack of information that Dumbledore had provided to Harry. I kind of felt that way as a fan, too, that we didn't get as much coming up to this point to really understand what was going on.

Eric: Hmm.

Micah: And that's why I feel...

Eric: And in the books we had so much more.

Micah: Yeah, exactly. And I feel - and look, I understand book-to-film adaptation, there's only so much that you can do. But I felt that there were integral things that were left out prior to this point that allowed this to drag maybe more than it had to.

Eric: There's the third change I noticed between the pre-screening and the final film is there is a moment they're walking through the tall grass when they're in the woods, when they're on the road, and it's a fairly open field and there is tall grass. And they kind of just keep going and it's one of those I want to say montages. It's not a montage, but Ron is watching Harry and Hermione kind of work together. Well, the scene originally, there was a moment where Ron stops them, and they're in the middle of the field and he says, "What's the game plan?" And Harry turns to him and says, "We're just going to keep going."

[Andrew laughs]

Eric: And Ron says, "Isn't that what we've been doing? Like the day before that and the day before that, and the day before that?" And Harry kind of - he is taken aback and then Hermione is, like, "Ron." And so there is some dissent there. There is this short moment where it's really, I guess, to help the passage of time, is what it originally was for because they have been doing this for weeks and weeks and weeks, and all of a sudden it's snowing. So, it was cut out but I think it still played well because the very, very next scene is when Ron does have the locket on and they are in the tent, and he says pretty much the same stuff. So, it was condensed maybe or that scene was removed, but I think it was still fine. It's one of those things that I really want to see on the deleted scenes because they are in a big open space and Ron is causing problems, so it's kind of significant.

Andrew: Let's try to get through these wood scenes particularly quickly. There were four that I listed here as standouts. Ron and Harry's fight, which was very good, and Richard, you had mentioned earlier that Dan's acting was kind of stiff. But here, I thought this was his standout scene. It felt very real between Harry and Ron, so I thought the acting was great.

Richard: Yeah.

Andrew: Would anyone agree/disagree with that?

Richard: I would agree. I almost thought they hated each other in real life, it was so convincing.

[Andrew and Eric laugh]



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Godric's Hollow


Andrew: Yeah. And that was good because the last thing you want is for that to be fake and I think a lot of viewers really connected with that. Then Godric's Hollow which probably was one of the more interesting parts of the woods, in terms of action going on. We see Harry and Hermione at his parents' grave which was a nice addition, as well as Bathilda being basically - turning into the snake. You could tell right from the start that she's creepy as hell but Harry was just so determined to get any sort of information out of her and of course, that backfired.

Eric: Well, she speaks Parseltongue.

Andrew: [laughs] Yeah, and like...

Eric: When she finally does speak, she speaks a little bit of Parseltongue. It's not subtitled, we don't know what she's saying.

Andrew: Why Harry did not just run at that point, I have no idea unless he was stalling so Hermione could look around.

Eric: Well...

Andrew: That was the one thing I was thinking.

Eric: Hermione discovering that room with the blood in it and the flies, a decaying corpse...

Andrew: [laughs] Yeah.

Eric: It's really - I feel like there was a little bit more of that in the pre-screening, but...

Andrew: Oh, but one other thing before we get to the dance, which I can't believe I didn't list that here. When ñ I had seen it twice, I saw it at a screening in London ñ so I, like most people who saw it the first time, jumped back when the snake comes jumping out from the lower level in Godric's Hollow. Well, for the second time that I saw it, I knew it was coming and I was sitting towards the back of the theater, so instead of watching the screen I was just staring at the audience. [laughs] And the entire theater backed up and just lurched when the snake jumped out that time. And then for the next few, like seriously, solid thirty seconds, everyone was just laughing [laughs] because everybody was so scared by that scene.

Eric: It's such a movie...

Micah: Yeah.

Eric: It's so common, but it still works as a movie technique.

Andrew: Right, it gets you every time.

Eric: Yeah.

Andrew: Yep. [laughs]

Micah: One thing...

Andrew: Thank god that wasn't in 3D. [laughs]



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: The Deathly Hallows Symbol


Micah: One thing I wanted to bring up, though, was the symbol, also, the Deathly Hallows symbol. I felt like they kind of just made it show up in different places but didn't really explain it that well. I mean - and the reason why I bring it up...

Eric: Well, Hermione ties it together.

Micah: ...is because it shows up on the grave - yeah, but it was - I don't feel like it was developed that well, either. You saw it on Xenophilius Lovegood at the wedding, then you saw it on the grave, and it was kind of like this whole underlying story of the Deathly Hallows. And I'm sure we'll talk about it when we get to the animation scene. It was just kind of...

Eric: Where else was it in the book - I mean, that it would be in the film? I feel like they touched - they had it in all the moments.

Micah: Not to us, to the regular viewer. It kind of moved very quickly and I don't know that a lot of people will catch on to it.

Eric: Well, Hermione specifically lists all the times that they were able to - that they saw that symbol to Xenophilius and there is this - literally, it lasted for sixty to eighty seconds where he has the piece of chalk and he draws - after we hear the story, he draws out the symbol, so it's really - the time spent, I thought, was just fine on that symbol. And maybe there are more implications about that, obviously Harry at one point has to discover that he has two of the three Hallows already on his person, but that's something for Part 2.

Micah: Yeah.

Richard: Going back to the Godric's Hollow section, one of my favorite scenes from the book was when Voldemort appeared and then had that flashback to when - the night when he was destroyed almost, and I was really disappointed that didn't make the film whatsoever.

Eric: Well, you know what's weird, wasn't there - there was a shot when Harry and Hermione are standing in front of the house, the destroyed house. Harry has some kind of flash and there is Lily's body on the ground, laying - there's a crib and it's turned over, like, split second. Did you guys see that?

Richard: I don't remember that bit.

Eric: It felt like ó yeah, it was really just a few seconds but it looked like a further shot of Harry's parents maybe mid-attack or after they had just been attacked. It was really weird.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Destroying the Locket Horcrux


Andrew: Let's talk about Ron returning and destroying the Horcrux. I think this again was pretty funny because Hermione is so pissed when Ron comes back [laughs] and asks Harry for her wand back, which was very funny. And the acting was just great, I loved that.

Eric: I thought that was one of those scenes that was obligatory for the audience. Ron visibly repentant, Hermione visibly reluctant to forgive Ron, and then some cheesy lines about, "Want to put it to a vote? I vote we go with Hermione." It's funny and I really enjoyed it, but I ñ what are you going to do? You're condensing a lot of emotions right now, so...

Micah: Yeah.

Andrew: I am jumping a little ahead though, of course, Ron destroying the Horcrux happens right before this. Did you guys like when the Horcrux gets opened by Harry and then we see the Horcrux talking smack on Ron, and then Harry and Hermione ñ the vision, they're nude, making out, we see side-boob.

[Micah laughs]

Eric: Actually...

Andrew: Eric Scull, your thoughts on the side-boob.

Eric: Okay, copious side-boob is the - okay, there is more of this scene than there was in the pre-release because the effects weren't completed, so there is a shot and they go back to them embracing, and they're actually really, really making out. But the problem I have is that Hermione's bust is visibly enhanced. And I mean, you can tell it's enhanced, or at least I can tell. I noticed it...

Andrew: It's not the real...

Eric: It's not the real deal...

Andrew: Hmm.

Eric: ...and originally when I first saw it it was the real deal, and it's going to be impossible for me to ever see that again and I'm really upset about that because they have enhanced it. It looks fake...

Andrew: So, they sexed it up a bit.

Eric: ...and they took me right out of the moment.

Andrew: They sexed it up.

Eric: They sexed it up just like they did - I think it was The Order of the Phoenix movie poster.

Andrew: The IMAX poster.

Eric: There were two versions.

Andrew: They added some...

Eric: Yeah, the IMAX movie poster. They...

Andrew: They enhanced Hermione's chest.

Micah: Or when Slughorn was checking out Hermione. Do you remember that in the Half-Blood Prince poster?

Eric: No.

Andrew: No. Was that...

Eric: Oh yeah, he has that look.

Micah: Yeah.

Andrew: Oh. [laughs]

Eric: And it's that. Yeah.

Andrew: Well...

Eric: But...

Andrew: But did...

Eric: Okay, so - yeah.

Andrew: Did you guys like this? I thought it came off really well. It was really a shining moment for Ron and Rupert's acting.

Eric: But it was...

Andrew: Which amazes me...

Eric: It could have been better.

Andrew: ...because honestly Rupert is such a bad interview. You try to ask him questions and he just cannot put out a comprehensible answer. But then his acting is so good that it's kind of unbelievable. [laughs] It's two different people. Or that it's one person - it's the same person. Any other thoughts about this?

Micah: Yeah, I thought this scene was good. I liked how the spiders came out first and then...

Andrew: Yeah.

Micah: ...you had Voldemort talking to him about how his mother really wanted a daughter but got Ron instead. And then it transitioned to the whole Harry/Hermione thing. I thought this scene was pretty good.

Andrew: And that, "what are you? What are you..."

Micah: Yeah, exactly.

Andrew: "...to this trio."

Micah: And the side-boob.

[Andrew and Micah laugh]

Eric: Well, like I said, it took me out of the moment. I feel like it was lesser because I don't think it looks like it's real. And maybe it's not because it's in Ron's head, but - I don't know, I wish they would have reduced - just kept it real. Like, come on, what's the - there was plenty of side-boob the first time around. I feel like they really enhanced it. I really do and it looks unreal to me.

Andrew: Well, as much as you guys would like to talk about the side-boob all day, we can't. So, we'll move on to - well, I guess that's it for this portion of the woods.

Eric: We skipped the silver doe, we skipped the...

Andrew: Oh okay, yeah. But is there much to talk about with that silver doe?

Eric: Well, it just - I want to make the comment, it seems plausible that Snape would be there in the woods, just out of sight. It seemed plausible. Do you guys agree? Because at this point, there is so much less Snape in this film, I guess, than there is in the - well, at this point it's just not explained at all, but it seemed plausible that Snape had been searching for the trio.

Micah: Well, I think - and I'd hope that it would be a flashback of sorts when you get that moment between Harry and Snape, and he takes a look at his memory in Part 2. I'd hope that you get a flashback to this particular scene as well...

Andrew: Yeah!

Micah: ...so you kind of see how he's been playing double agent the whole time.

Richard: How does he even find out? Because there is no picture of the guy from Grimmauld Place which is also another portrait in Dumbledore's office, so how does Snape even find out about what their current location is?

Eric: You mean Phineas Nigellus?

Richard: Yeah.

Eric: Yeah, he's unable to discern their situation from the portrait.

Micah: Oh yeah, because Hermione takes the portrait, right...

Eric: I don't know.

Richard: Yeah.

Micah: ...along with them?

Richard: But...

Andrew: Yeah.

Eric: Yeah, and they were talking to - she mentions specifically being in the Forest of Dean where she's never been before.

Richard: Exactly.

Andrew: David Yates specifically takes that out, actually. He said when I interviewed him - we asked how do you decide what to take out, what to keep in, in terms of adapting. And he specifically mentioned that one thing - [laughs] Hermione taking the portrait. They purposely left that out, so - that doesn't add anything but...

Richard: But how did Snape find them? Well, it will be interesting to see how they explain that in the next film, I guess.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: Harry and Hermione's Dance


Andrew: Yeah. Snape will just be, like, "I was watching you," with no real explanation. One other thing that...

Eric: Harry and Hermione dancing?

Andrew: Yes, Harry and Hermione dancing. Dan, he's quoted as saying that this - Harry Potter has never felt more real than this scene because it's a great song by...

Eric: Nick Cave.

Andrew: Nick Cave. Thank you. Eric, do you know the name of the song?

Eric: Yeah, "O Children." And it has parenthesis...

Andrew: Yeah, I love the song. I thought it was a perfect match. David Yates said he spent a lot of time, he went through hundreds of songs trying to find the perfect one that would give off a sense of hope, but also that there is still some trouble going on. So...

Eric: They're still kids, you know?

Andrew: They're still kids.

Eric: And Dan's dancing - I didn't notice this the first time. The second time I saw this - his dancing is just so cheesy.

Andrew: Same. Yeah, I didn't notice this the first time either, but...

Eric: Yeah, it's Dan Harry. It's Felix Felicis Harry, basically, trying to find a happy moment. And later, I guess I heard somewhere that the trio was instructed - or Dan and Emma were instructed to play that scene as if it would end in their kissing.

Andrew: Hmm.

Eric: Because there is this great moment at the end of it where there is that tension for only the tiniest of seconds and obviously they come to themselves, they pull back. But it's not - it's just so tender.

Andrew: Yeah, I have to say, I was almost fooled. As someone who has read the books and knows the outcome, I thought Harry and Hermione were going to kiss. [laughs] They were getting pretty close and - but I've told this to a couple of people now and they were, like, "What are you talking about? I didn't feel that way at all."

Richard: I thought they would as well.

Eric: Yeah. But I'm glad they didn't, obviously. But I think that the tenderness is something that's real. It's real acting from both of them.

Andrew: Definitely.

Eric: And it's just something that I think is one of the biggest points of this film, is just the acting from the kids.



Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review: The Tale of the Three Brothers


Andrew: So next up, the Lovegood's home. When the trio get to the Lovegood's home and we see Xenophilius Lovegood for the first time. And he - well, not for the first time. We saw him at the wedding as well.

Eric: The second time.

Andrew: Yeah.

Eric: Yeah.

Andrew: And we see the big Three Brothers animation which everyone, critic or not, whether you like the story or not - everyone seemed to be in agreement that this animation was just very well done.

Eric: Yeah. This animation was completely completed. It's almost like they sent it away to another company that does these for a living and had commissioned it.

Andrew: Yeah, they hired a separate - someone outside of who normally does Harry Potter stuff to work on this and it was inspired...

Eric: Yeah.

Andrew: ...by Chinese shadow puppets and some other work as well. I mean, it was fun to watch.

Eric: It's brilliant.

Andrew: Of course...

Eric: I am so happy that they had that completed in time for the pre-screening because it was the entire scene just as it is.

Andrew: Oh, good.

Eric: Because obviously they are not going to change it because it's either they have the product or they don't...

Andrew: Right.

Eric: ...if they outsource it. So...

Andrew: Of course, the glaring change here was Hermione reading the story, telling the story, rather than Ollivander, which I thought was a bit odd when you think about it because then it's, like, "Well, why did they go to the Lovegood's house in the first place if Hermione had the story the whole time? Couldn't she have figured this out? Couldn't she have...

Eric: No, she hasn't.

Andrew: But...

Eric: She didn't make that connection.

Andrew: ...she figures out everything, [laughs] so...

[Eric laughs]

Andrew: You know what I mean?

Eric: Eventually.

Andrew: She could have, so - I don't know.

Micah: Well, yeah...

Andrew: It would have been nice if they kept how it was in the book with Ollivander.

Micah: I think that - going back to what I said before, with the Deathly Hallows and kind of it being rushed. Eric, the whole symbol thing, I think - and again, look, I understand things need to be left out of the films just from a time standpoint. But the whole scene where Viktor Krum notices the symbol around Xenophilius Lovegood's neck, he mentions...

Eric: Yeah.

Micah: ...Gregorovitch. Nobody has a clue who Gregorovitch is in this film.

Andrew: Yeah.

Micah: Harry passingly comments on him as the wandmaker and - or Hermione, I forget. I think Harry says, "He's after Gregorovitch," and Hermione goes, "Oh, the wandmaker?" Well, fans only know...

[Eric laughs]

Micah: ...Ollivander up until this point. Who is Gregorovitch? And then the scene, of course, in - what's it, Nurmengard, I think is the name of the prison? People are - I guarantee you there are going to be people who are lost with that scene, have no idea...

Andrew: Yeah.

Micah: ...what's going on. And the whole backstory with Grindelwald.

Eric: Okay.

Micah: You have to agree with that, Eric. I mean, he just shows up at the prison, talks to him, gets this fleeting memory out of him, kills him and Harry wakes up. And it's like...

Eric: Yeah, what I liked about that scene - sorry, go on.

Micah: No, I'm just saying - and then you go to the grave and you see the symbol on Peverell's grave, and then you go to the Lovegood home. I feel like people who haven't read the books are not going to follow that storyline and the movie is called Deathly Hallows.

Eric: Well, like...

Micah: So...

[Andrew laughs]

Eric: The movie is called Deathly Hallows, but like Richard said - okay, Richard brought up the point about Voldemort not being in Bathilda's. The snake jumps up at the screen, Harry and Hermione Apparate or Disapparate kind of sideways. It reminded me of that scene in Chamber of Secrets when Harry goes through the Floo Network and he shoots out of the fireplace sideways. They basically Disapparate through the wall out of the house, but there is no Voldemort in Godric's Hollow. And the only Voldemort we get is scenes like this where Harry is dreaming, and Voldemort goes and interviews Gregorovitch, and I think we're meant to believe it's Legilimency, that Voldemort is actually physically reading Gregorovitch's mind because he doesn't - there is no exposition. And it's short but I don't know. I feel like the essentials were there. I mean, to me - maybe this is like offensive, but do you think that they cast the actor who played Gregorovitch as a gay man?

[Andrew laughs]

Eric: Because it just came across that way to me.

Andrew: This is irrelevant.

Eric: My gay-dar went off the charts. My gay-dar just went off the charts.

Andrew: Okay.

Eric: So, that's canon.

Andrew: Well...

Eric: That's canon.

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