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According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a quibble is an “objection to a point of detail, a minor complaint or criticism,” but criticism is only a small part of the analysis we have here. Take some time to browse and comment on the fan essays we’ve collected, or compose a quibble of your very own and send it in – it might just make it onto the main page of MuggleNet!

So you would like to send us a quibble? That’s great! First, check out our FAQs and submission guidelines so you can make your editorial as strong as possible. Happy writing!

 

Rules for Submission

To submit your quibble to us, send it in an email to mugglenetessays@gmail.com. Make sure to put the text of your essay in the body of your message. If you have specific ways you want your essay to be formatted, be sure to include those directions in your email.

Before sending your email to us, please make sure you:

  • Title your essay.
  • Claim authorship or leave a pen name in the email.
  • Cite page numbers where you use quotes from the books.
  • Keep your text between 500-2000 words.
  • Use appropriate and accessible language.
  • Submit a short summary of your essay in the body of the email.
  • Use a clear format to organize your ideas.
  • Proofread.
  • Pose a question in the beginning and form a conclusion by the end.

Note: MuggleNet.com does not claim ownership of your essay, nor will we recreate it on any other parts of the site. However, we might just make some spelling and/or grammar corrections.

Below are some tips from various members of our past and present Editorials staff, aimed to help you make your essay the very best it can be!

Writing Tips

So you want to write for MuggleNet?

Because we receive editorials daily, many of which address two or three main topics, we thought sharing a few tips from the editors’ side of the process might help the editorial writer who wants their submission to stand out from the rest. So feel free to treat the following ideas as a checklist of sorts – we guarantee you’ll raise your odds of being posted. And don’t forget to have fun!


Writing Tips

  • Grammar is extremely important. If we can’t read it easily, we’re apt to delete it. If you grossly misspell the names of important characters, spells, or places, we feel you don’t really care. Punctuation styles may vary, as different countries use different styles, so just be sure to use one style and stick to it.
  • Beware the overanalyzed topic. At the present time, these include “Is Snape good or bad?” and “Does Ron really belong in Gryffindor house?” It’s not that we won’t accept editorials on these topics; we just hope you’ve read what’s already been posted and find an original and interesting angle by which to approach the question.
  • Don’t rush. We don’t always post long and heavily researched editorials (although some of us prefer them). Often, a reader is unexpectedly blessed with an original idea, quickly types an editorial, and sends it to us. Those with a natural gift for good grammar and creative writing are lucky; most others should relax and know we’re always here, and the odds that someone else has seized upon your original idea are very low in most cases. Take your time. Jot your original idea down, brainstorm, look for supporting (and unsupporting!) evidence in the books, and address them in the editorial.
  • Cite all quotes! Double-check you’ve copied the quote word for word, and include the page number(s), chapter name, and edition (e.g., US hardback). If you use the same edition throughout, you only have to say so in the first citation.

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Submission Tips

  • Be sure your editorial is ready for publication. It’s very confusing for us to get one, two, and sometimes three revisions. We have to go back and delete the old ones, and at times that can be a harrowing experience as we have to traverse the trenches of queued editorials. However, if new information comes to light after you’ve submitted your editorial and before it’s been posted, feel free to send us an updated (and complete) version with a short explanation of the changes made.
  • Clearly state the purpose of your email. If you are leaving feedback for a particular author or columnist, state it so we know where to forward the email. If you are sending us an editorial for a specific section other than the main page, tell us so. Also, please include your name as we would like to publish it with the editorial.
  • Familiarize yourself with the section before contacting us with questions. Oftentimes, the answer to your question will appear before your eyes that way (see our Editorial FAQs below). For instance, if you would like to send feedback to a particular columnist and want to bypass the standard editorial email address, you’ll likely find the writer’s personal email address at the end of his or her column’s main page.
  • It’s not required, but it would be helpful if a very brief description of the main point of your editorial is included in the email (especially if you’re sending an attachment). If you’re writing about an already overanalyzed topic, be sure to include how you look at it in an original way or include your fascinating conclusion – whatever you think will grab our attention.
  • Send one editorial per email. It helps us keep up with submissions, and at times it will prevent a two-for-one deletion.

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Miscellaneous Tips

  • Sometimes bravado works, sometimes it doesn’t. Be sure you know how to use it before trying it on us.
  • ALL CAPS is the very rude equivalent of yelling. Please don’t do it.
  • Get to know us! We promise we’re nice people. Read through our editorials! Want more dirt on us? Check out the “About Us” page.

We hope those helped a little. Don’t let them intimidate or deter you… we just want you to know some of the standard things we look for in a process that often requires a first-glance pass through. We’ll add more tips as we think of them.

Good luck!

Have more questions? Read our Editorial FAQs below.

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FAQs

How do I submit an editorial?
Send your editorial directly through email, or as an attachment (preferably Microsoft Word documents), to mugglenetessays@gmail.com with “Editorial” as the subject.

Can I be a columnist?
We usually choose columnists from reliable authors who have consistently shown us they can write thought-provoking editorials. In other words, if you’re interested in writing a regular column for us, don’t ask us – show us. If you have ideas you’d like to share, write them up and send us editorials to post. Whether or not you’re tapped to be a columnist, you’re getting your ideas out there.

How long will it take for my editorial to be posted?
There is no set time limit. We’ve posted editorials the same day, the next day, and even four months later. It depends on so many factors, including the amount of editorials we receive daily.

Will you let me know that you’ve received my editorial?
Sorry! We receive too many editorials to be able to do this for everyone. Unless you receive an error message, be assured that we’ve received your email.

Will you tell me why you decided not to post my editorial?
Again, sorry! Too many editorials to be able to do this for everyone, and frankly, we don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings. If it’s constructive criticism you’re after, contact one of the editors individually and we’ll help you as best as we can. If you feel that your editorial is worthy to be posted on MuggleNet and it still hasn’t been posted six months later, feel free to submit it again – funny things can happen.

English isn’t my primary language. Can I still submit an editorial?
Please only submit works if you are highly proficient in written English.

Can my editorial be linked to a thread in the CoS forums?
We actually don’t have a strong connection to the CoS forums anymore. Instead, readers can leave comments on any of the editorials, which authors can feel free to respond to.

If you have any questions about writing for MuggleNet that are not addressed here, email us at mugglenetessays@gmail.com