Seven Times Hermione Granger Took Ron Weasley’s Lines in the Movies

When a book is adapted into a movie, it’s guaranteed to lose some things during the process of translation. Characters are modified or dropped, plot lines are squished together because of time, etc., etc. Screenwriters, producers, and directors are all at the mercy of the viewing audience – they must deliver a piece of work that can be enjoyed on its own merits, that can be understood and digested by those who are freshly new to the material as well as those who are avid fans of the original source material, while at the same time not doing a disservice to those same fans by cobblestone-ing a world from literal scratch.

I get it. However, one of the biggest pet peeves I have with the entire Harry Potter movie series is the shaft the writers and producers have given Ron Weasley. I have to admit, I’m a bit biased, as a Ron fangirl, but people who’ve only watched the movies do not understand how important a role Ron plays as best friend to Harry as well as significant member of the trio. If we were to strictly go off movieverse only, then we would see Ron simply as an annoying, comedic sidekick, a cockblock to the burgeoning relationship between Harry and Hermione. Movie-Ron is not Harry’s confidant, his guide into the bemusing world of magic, his closest friend who keeps Harry tethered to the nearest thing to a family he knows.

Instead, the movies pigeonhole Hermione into that role. In the books, she’s a Muggle-born who exists as both Harry’s equal in terms of being completely new to the traditions and unspoken rules of the wizarding world and the unofficial leader of the trio, consistently saving the boys’ butts because she’s the HBIC. And while it’s true that Hermione is Harry’s close friend, and she offers a lifeline to him during Ron and Harry’s broken friendship during GoF… COME. ON.

Harry needs both Ron and Hermione in his life; together, Ron and Hermione allow Harry to be a fully functioning, more-than-adequately happy human being. By ripping the dialogue out of book-Ron’s mouth and shoving them into movie-Hermione’s does nothing except satisfy Harry/Hermione shippers and destroy any character building on Ron’s part.

Instead of compiling a neverending list of grievances, I’ve put together a short one, going movie by movie, of the seven (most obvious) times movie-Hermione (through no fault of her own) took book-Ron’s lines.

*Quotes from books have been modified.

1. Sorcerer’s Stone

Source: Tumblr

Book:

Hermione: Stop moving! I know what this is – it’s Devil’s Snare!
Ron: Oh, I’m so glad we know what it’s called, that’s a great help.
Hermione: Shut up, I’m trying to remember how to kill it! What did Professor Sprout say? – it likes the dark and the damp –
Harry: So light a fire!
Hermione: Yes – of course – but there’s no wood!
Ron: HAVE YOU GONE MAD? ARE YOU A WITCH OR NOT?

Movie:

Hermione: Stop moving, both of you. This is Devil’s Snare! You have to relax. If you don’t, it’ll only kill you faster!
Ron: Kill us faster?! Oh, now I can relax!

As 11-year-olds, none of the three could be faulted for freaking out under pressure, under the imminent promise of death by Devil’s Snare. HOWEVER. By this subtle change – placing Ron in total damsel-in-distress mode – the viewers have already eliminated Ron as a hero. In the book, no matter what situation, Ron can always depend on his natural-born wizarding instinct. In the movie, it doesn’t matter that Ron is a wizard. All that matters is that Ron has lesser skill in conducting magic than Hermione does.

2. Chamber of Secrets

Source: Teen.com

Book:

Harry: Malfoy called Hermione something – it must’ve been really bad, because everyone went wild.
Ron: It
was bad. Malfoy called her ‘Mudblood,’ Hagrid –
Hermione: But I don’t know what it means. I could tell it was really rude, of course –
Ron: It’s about the most insulting thing he could think of. Mudblood’s a really foul name for someone who is Muggle-born – you know, non-magic parents. It’s a disgusting thing to call someone. Dirty blood, see. Common blood. It’s ridiculous.

Movie:

Hermione: He called me a Mudblood.
Harry: What’s a Mudblood?

Hermione: It means dirty blood. Mudblood’s a really foul name for someone who’s Muggle-born. Someone with non-magic parents. Someone like me. It’s not a term one usually hears in civilized conversation.

Both Hermione and Harry are unfamiliar with things in the wizarding world that aren’t explicitly explained in textbooks, things like classicism. Ron, a pure-blood who is equally mystified by the customs of the Muggle world, bridges that gap and helps explain certain scenarios like this one. How on earth would Hermione know anything about awful slurs like “Mudblood”? She is 12 years old and up to this point, has been safely ensconced in a world whose troubles and mysteries could easily be solved with research, luck, and skill. From whom, or where, could she have discovered the degrading meaning behind Malfoy’s insult?

3. Prisoner of Azkaban

Source: Tumblr

Book:

Harry & Hermione: Professor, Black’s telling the truth – we saw Pettigrew – he [Pettigrew] escaped when Professor Lupin turned into a werewolf – he’s [Pettigrew’s] a rat – Pettigrew’s front paw, I mean, finger, he cut it off – Pettigrew attacked Ron, it wasn’t Sirius –

Movie:

Hermione: Headmaster, you’ve got to stop them! They’ve got the wrong man!
Harry: It’s true, sir! Sirius is innocent!
Ron: It’s Scabbers who did it. He’s my rat, sir. Well, he’s not really a rat. Well, he
was a rat, he was my brother’s Percy’s rat, but then they gave him an owl, and I got –
Hermione: The
point is, we know the truth. Please believe us.

In this case, the movie gave Ron lines in this scene, whereas the book didn’t. However, the lines that Ron said further diminished the viewer’s ability to see him as anything more than a comedic sidekick. In the movie scene, Ron is discombobulated and well, stupid, blabbering on about his rat and Pettigrew. Hermione gives him an exasperating look and turns to firmly, and coherently, tell Dumbledore that Snape is lying. In the book, Ron is not even in this scene; he’s recovering from his leg wound. Why insert him, acting like a fool, into this scene at all? There’s nothing to be gained here, except snickering at a hapless Ron.

4. Goblet of Fire

Source: Tumblr

Book:

Ron: Why did I do it? I don’t know what made me do it!
Ginny: He – er – just asked Fleur Delacour to go to the ball with him.
Harry: You
what?
Ron: I don’t know what made me do it! What was I playing at? There were people – all around – I’ve gone mad – everyone watching! I was just walking past her in the entrance hall – she was standing there talking to Diggory – and it sort of came over me – and I asked her!

Movie:

Ginny: It’s okay, Ron. It’s alright. It doesn’t matter.
Harry: What happened to you?
Ginny: He just asked Fleur Delacour out.
Hermione: What?
Harry: What did she say?
Hermione: She said yes?
Ron: Don’t be silly. There she was, just walking by… you know how I like it when they walk… I couldn’t help it! It just sort of slipped out.
Ginny: Actually, he sort of screamed at her. It was a bit frightening.

This scene is also a modification, rather than a total bunging of Ron’s lines. However, Ron’s agency is completely stripped away – even though Ginny and Hermione’s secondhand input here is hilarious, Ron is once again reduced to the funny sidekick, a buffoon who mirrors Harry’s own attempts at opposite gender interaction but as a way to help move the “teenagers stumbling over hormones” story along. This scene also neatly sidesteps the acknowledgement that Fleur is part Veela, an interesting and significant trivia bit that is never actually acknowledged throughout the entire movie series.

5. Order of the Phoenix

Source: Tumblr

Book:

Ron: We told Dumbledore we wanted to tell you what was going on. We did, mate. But he’s really busy now, we’ve only seen him twice since we came here and he didn’t have much time, he just made us swear not to tell you important stuff when we wrote, he said the owls might be intercepted.

Movie:

Harry: You couldn’t have put this in a letter, I suppose. I’ve gone all summer without a scrap of news.
Ron: We wanted to tell you, mate. Really, we did. Only –
Hermione: Only Dumbledore made us swear that we wouldn’t tell you anything.

One of the biggest themes throughout the entire book series is Harry and Ron’s friendship, cemented since that fateful day both 11-year-olds sat in the same train compartment. One of the biggest missteps the movies continually makes is to brush aside that friendship. It may seem inconsequential that Hermione, not Ron, is the one who admits that Dumbledore made her and Ron swear not to tell Harry anything over the summer. However, by doing so, the directors are making it clear that Hermione is Harry’s right-hand (wo)man, his trusted confidant, the one who breaks the hard news to Harry, the one who snaps him out of his self-serving stupor. And what happens to Ron, in this case? He’s basically a stand-in. He’s got no personality, he’s got no voice, he’s got none of the qualities that make Ron the book character so damn interesting.

6. Half-Blood Prince

Source: Fanpop

Book:

Harry: I’m not coming back even if it does reopen.
Hermione: I knew you were going to say that. But then what will you do?
Ron: We’ll be there, Harry. At your aunt and uncle’s house. And then we’ll go with you wherever you’re going.
Harry: No –
Hermione: You said to us once before, that there was time to turn back if we wanted to. We’ve had time, haven’t we?
Ron: We’re with you whatever happens.

Movie:

Harry: I’m not coming back, Hermione. I’ve got to finish whatever Dumbledore started, and I don’t know where that’ll lead me, but I’ll let you and Ron know where I am, when I can.
Hermione: I’ve always admired your courage, Harry, but sometimes you can be really thick. You don’t really thick you’re going to be able to find all those Horcruxes by yourself, do you? You need us, Harry.

Sigh. Once again, the movie wipes out any indication that the Harry-Ron-Hermione trio is an actual trio, one that is made up of supportive and equal partners. Granted, Rupert Grint was recovering from swine flu during the shooting of this last scene, so there’s a reason why it seemed so awkward and stilted. Because it was. However, that is absolutely no excuse why Ron was rendered essentially speechless for the last ten-odd minutes of the film. The reassuring camaraderie that seeps through the last pages of the book, after Dumbledore’s somber funeral, is extinguished in the film version. Instead of Harry’s two best friends comforting Harry, gently letting him know that they are with him, through thick and thin, it’s just Hermione, in a thinly veiled Harry/Hermione scene, admonishing Harry at his inability to let others help him in need.

7. Deathly Hallows

Source: Tumblr

Book:

Ron: We thought you knew what you were doing! We thought Dumbledore had told you what to do, we thought you had a real plan!
Hermione: Ron! Take off the locket, Ron. Please take it off. You wouldn’t be talking like this if you hadn’t been wearing it all day.
Harry: Leave the Horcrux.
Ron: What are you doing?
Hermione: What do you mean?
Ron: Are you staying, or what?
Hermione: I – Yes – yes, I’m staying. Ron, we said we’d go with Harry, we said we’d help –
Ron: I get it. You choose him.
Hermione: Ron, no – please – come back, come back!

Movie:

Ron: You don’t know why I listen to the radio, do you? To make sure I don’t hear Ginny’s name. Or Fred, or George, or Mum.
Harry: You think I’m not listening too? You think I don’t know how this feels?
Ron: No, you don’t know how it feels! Your parents are dead! You have no family!
Hermione: Stop!
Harry: Fine then, go! Go then!
Ron: [to Hermione] And you? Are you coming or are you staying? Fine. I get it. I saw you two the other night.
Hermione: Ron, that’s – that’s nothing!

Because of time restraints, the last three movies can’t help but ramp up tension to compensate for merged or dropped plotlines. In this scene, tension is definitely at an all-time high, and some language has been changed so that the audience realizes just how ragged the three characters are at this point in the film. HOWEVER. Damn Steve Kloves and his Harry/Hermione shipper heart. By having Hermione stammer, voice breaking, that Ron seeing the two of them with their heads together, trying to figure out where the next Horcrux would be, was not the romantic scenario he imagines, the audience can’t help wonder “…maybe?” Ron looks cuckolded and paranoid, Hermione looks helpless, and Harry looks righteous, which are feelings that aren’t appropriate for this particular scene. This is a scene in which a friendship splinters, in which the quest is questioned, in which allegiances must be drawn. The movie viewer who has not read the book doesn’t realize that’s the point of this scene. He or she simply sees a scene that pits these three characters into a one-dimensional love triangle, which is unfortunate.

 

What do you guys think? Have I egregiously missed another instance where Hermione took Ron’s lines in the movies? Sound off in the comments below!

  • Drea

    I agree with you so much I can barely articulate myself. I am also a big fan of Ron and all the changes bugged me so, so much. I would rant and rave after every movie about all the changes but especially about how Ron’s character was destroyed.

  • Melody Christine Stedman

    While I see your point throughout most of this, there is one thing that I would like to point out about your argument on the lines in the movie for HBP. While Harry does speak directly to Hermione, Ron is still in the same room, sitting on the steps off to the side while Hermione and Harry talk at the edge, so while he didn’t say anything in the scene, he wasn’t completely missing. Harry even looks over at Ron at one point, and Hermione comments that Ron’s okay with Harry and Ginny being together.

    • Jasmine Lee

      Right, right. However, the entire framing of that scene literally sidelines Ron. He says no words. Even Hermione saying that Ron is okay with Harry and Ginny being together — why couldn’t Ron himself say those words?
      It just seemed very deliberate, keeping him within the trio, but isolated and lesser. Instead of an equal partnership, Harry and Hermione are constantly emphasized as the smart, capable superhero duo, with Ron coming up in the rear. This is not how JKR portrays him in the books at all.

      • Albus

        But if you think about it even in the books, Hermione is the smart one, Harry is the Chosen One and Ron is… what exactly? The Jealous One? I mean, I love Ron because in the books I think he’s much better fleshed out than Hermione but you have to admit that JKR doesn’t exactly give him a clear role to play or a clear quality with which he contributes (except in book one where he’s clearly the strategist of the Chess game). Of course the movies oversimplify things because this is what movies do. But I can see where they’re coming from. Just like I can see where they’re coming from with Ginny’s character too and her relationship with Harry. It’s not fleshed out in the books, so it’s not fleshed out in the movies either.

        • Renee

          Ron is the loyal one. Throughout the books he is constantly by his friend’s side. Even when he gets mad or a bit jealous. I don’t think he was ever meant to just be comic relief

          • Lisa

            The loyal one? He ditched Harry twice and wouldn’t believe Harry didn’t put his own name in the Goblet. How is Ron more loyal than Hermione anyway? She never wavered from Harry’s side.

          • Jasmine Lee

            We all know that Ron is easily hurt and is as stubborn as any other Weasley. Just because he ran away from Harry and simmered at him because of the whole goblet thing doesn’t mean that he’s disloyal. Ron constantly makes mistakes. He doesn’t take everything for face value. He struggles to understand the differences between the wizarding world and the Muggle world. Just because Hermione never wavered from Harry’s side (and you mean that in a literal, physical way, right? Because Hermione voiced her opinions against Harry’s plenty of times) doesn’t mean that she is more loyal and more deserving of agency than Ron is.

          • Lisa

            I wasn’t calling him disloyal at all nor undeserving of agency. But I do think it’s weird to say that he’s the designated loyal one just like Hermione is the designated smart one, since Ron’s loyalty to Harry isn’t stronger than Hermione’s. It all boils down to whether or not he has a clear role in the trio. If he does not, then it’s perhaps understandable that the movies focused more on Harry and Hermione.

        • Elizabeth Crosman

          John Granger (author) wrote several books about the Harry Potter series. He described how the trio was like different parts of a person. Hermione obviously the intellect. I think he put Ron as the heart, the emotions. (In psychological parlance, one might say they were the Id, Ego, and Super-ego) Anyone who wants to dig into deeper meaning in Harry Potter should check out his books.

          • Jasmine Lee

            Um, this sounds amazing. I will DEFINITELY track his books down. o/

        • Ana Melo

          I do understand why to many isn’t clear the role of Ron in the trio, but I remember J.K. Rowling explained in a interview or some of them his role in the trio, I think is “J.K.Rowling Beyond The Page” it’s in scholastic reading club website.
          I think Ron’s role is to be the “morale” of the trio and also the one who holds most of the common sense if you think about it, specially about wizard community.

  • Iris

    A lot of my friends who’ve only watched the movies don’t understand why I love Ron and I just don’t get it. Now it makes senses! They gave the lines to Hermione!

    • Jane Bloggs

      well they obviously don’t even pay good attention to the movies either.
      Because I watched the movies before I read the books, and I thought Ron was cool… (Chess Scene is still one of my Favorites!)

      • Jasmine Lee

        Heroic movie-Ron is my absolute favorite. :3

        • Jane Bloggs

          thank you

  • Sarah

    I agree with you so much it hurts. But I think the worst mutilation of Ron’s character (besides the atrocity that was Goblet of Fire) happened in PoA, when Ron’s line “If you want to kill Harry you’ll have to kill us too!” is given to–wait for it–Hermione. I don’t think I will ever recover from how much that infuriates me. Ron is literally sitting on the floor whimpering.

    • Jasmine Lee

      *vigorous nodding*
      Now I can’t believe I chose that hospital scene in PoA instead of the Shrieking Shack scene. That scene and the Mudblood scene were totally the ones that inspired me to write this article, and I spaced and didn’t include the former. Argh. Well! Thank you for giving it its due in the comments! 🙂

  • Erin

    Totally agreed….and now for the times Neville was given Dobby’s lines…

    • Jasmine Lee

      Yes! The whole gillyweed scene *headdesk*

      • Jane Bloggs

        personally I thought that made way more sense than Dobby doing it.
        Don’t get me wrong I like Dobby and i missed the ‘your wheezy! mr potter! they’ve taken your wheezy!’ but it seemed a little convoluted about Dobby hearing the right conversation, breaking into the potion supply room,etc,etc

        When Moody gave Neville the book on aquatic plants (also in the GoF book) so that Neville would help harry.

        so it made more sense to me for Neville, who was an very knowledgeable on plants, to tell harry.

        • Dawn Kelley

          Well having Neville do it only took an actor showing up in costumes, having a house elf do it cost the money of digital processing on a house elf. I see where someone might have thought it wasn’t worth it. However, where they lost ground in the long game with that decision was that Dobby disappeared after CoS and then we were suppose to be magically re-invested in his character in the final film.

          What the films did very badly was invest themselves in the long game of unity as a series. The individual films, especially the early ones, suffer from treating themselves more like individual one-shot episodes then small parts of a larger picture that’s eventually suppose to all come together as one seven year journey.

  • I’ve been screaming all of these changes at the top of my voice every time I have the displeasure of watching the movies. They’ve undermined the character of Ron as just a comedic-relief side-kick who emerges out of nowhere to kiss the leading lady as a plot twist. Like no ! Ron is so much more than that !! He is overshadowed, he is flawed, he is human but he is also brave. They reduced his character’s traits soo much in the movie that I cant help hate Rupert for it (even though i know it’s not his fault.. but still)

    • Elizabeth Crosman

      Not to mention that the kiss came out of Ron’s wanting to save the House elves, not just because they were together when Hermione destroyed a horcrux! It didn’t seem real. (Ginny and Harry’s romance and kiss were done wrong in the movies too!)

      • Jasmine Lee

        YES. OMG. Ron’s and Hermione’s first kiss down in the Chamber makes me want to scream. (One of the reasons absolutely being that we didn’t get to see Rupert’s intense face during the whole thing. DAMMIT, Kloves, I wanted to see his jawline clenching!) Hermione running at Ron and kissing him after he verbalizes his concern about the house elves was just so perfect and necessary.

        Ron sucking up to Hermione after he got back to her and Harry because of the Deluminator was funny and adorable, but she needed a real indication of his change. Ron made so much fun of her when she first talked about SPEW, and he hated Kreacher out of all three of them; his very real concern about needing to save the house elves was a giant step forward in the culmination of their relationship and THE MOVIE TOTALLY SIDESTEPPED IT. DAMMIT.

      • Iain Walker

        In fairness, the film-makers strip out Hermione’s entire S.P.E.W. arc, so predicating the kiss on Ron worrying about the house elves wouldn’t have made much sense in the films.

        However, the fact that they cut out the S.P.E.W. arc also shortchanged Hermione’s character, since it was one of the main things in the books that helped establish her as a protagonist in her own right, as a character not just defined by her relationships with the male characters. So while Ron still gets the shortest end of the stick, Hermione also suffers from the book-to-film adaptation.

        • lisse

          Good point. And, stripping Hermione’s SPEW arc strips her of her compassion and her flaws too. As a brown girl, I always viewed the SPEW arc uncomfortably, as Hermione’s behavior had the airs of white saviorism where white people talk over the people they want to “save”. So, cutting the SPEW arc damages Hermione’s character in multiple ways as it erases her flaws too.

        • Jasmine Lee

          The movies’ treatment of the house elves in general make me twitch and wonder just why JKR allowed the movie adaptation to happen before she finished her series. So many little details decided as unimportant by each movies’ producers actually played incredibly important and significant roles overall – e.g. SPEW, Kreacher, Snape’s memories – which no one knew except for JKR, and I think the whole film series got the short end of the stick because of that.

          Man. Opportunities missed.

          (I am NOT looking forward to the animated reboot of the series, though. Reboots should give the original source at least a handful of decades to breathe before reworking the first iteration, shouldn’t they? Oy.)

  • Ana B.

    I loved this article so much!! And as much as I love watching the movies, I can’t help but get frustrated at things like this. Whenever I’m watching DH and Ron says, “I saw you two the other night”, I cringe. I also think that giving some of Ron’s lines to Hermione not only decreases his character, but hers as well. Movie-Hermione has waaaaay less flaws than book-Hermione and is less well-rounded. Great article! 🙂

    • Jasmine Lee

      Thanks, Ana!
      Right?! Ron *is* a jealous little turd in the 7th book, but the movies make him — it’s just a weird take on it, when he says stuff like “I saw you two the other night.” I absolutely agree that both Ron’s and Hermione’s characters are definitely weaker because of the decision to turn Hermione into a combination of both characters.

      • Ana B.

        Yes!! Of course he was a jerk, and all of that was fine, but you’re 100% right that Steve Kloves’ shipper heart made it seem like Harry/Hermione/Ron was a love triangle (when in the books it was only ever a love triangle in Ron’s head). Like I think the dance scene with Harry and Hermione is really sweet but then when they dramatically pull away and they look like they’re going to kiss??? Haha sorry whoa I got off-topic. TL;DR you’re completely right!

  • Snidget

    amen

  • Sarah

    The worst one from PoA is in the Shrieking Shack.
    Book Ron: With an injured, bleeding leg LIMPS in front of Harry and tells Sirius that if he wants to kill Harry he’s going to have to kill all of them.
    Movie Ron: Blubbers in the background while Hermione steals his line.

  • Cate Flanagan

    Thank you so much for writing this. It articulates everything I have been feeling for years. Recently (after rewatching a few of the later movies) I realized that the huge differences between book Ron and movie Ron are probably the reason both Emma Watson and JK Rowling questioned the Ron/Hermione pairing. Movie Ron brings nothing to the table, in spite of Rupert Grint’s amazing acting.

    • Jane Bloggs

      Emma didn’t question it the ‘fans wonder if Ron could make her happy…’ was her trying to see it from the ‘Harmonians’ perspective. She never said she thought that.

      and in fact she’s the once that said the nicer things about Ron thoughout the interview.

  • Leah

    What about when Ron suggested to ride on the dragons in the book but the movie Hermione suggests it. That is the one that bugged me the most.

  • Cristina

    I think there’s a moment in CoS when Hermione says, “Even in the Wizarding World, hearing voices isn’t good,” which Hermione wouldn’t know about, because she was raised in the Muggle world.
    Ron says that line in the books.

  • Zack

    I don’t mind that much at all, but mostly because I view the films and books as separate entities. Regarding how Hermione would know certain things that Ron says in the books, it does make sense because it has already been established that Hermione has done extensive research into the Wizarding World when we first meet her in the first film. So of course it is likely that she will have remembered this stuff–but that doesn’t undermine her role in the books, either. Just two different versions of the same character.

    My favorite character is Hermione, in both the books and the films. So that’s another reason why it doesn’t bother me. But for Ron-lovers out there, yes, I can understand the frustration. But I do think that these lines could have been said by either Ron OR Hermione in the books and it wouldn’t have made a difference either way.

    • Jenny

      The finer point though is that Hermione is very well read in history and hard facts but when it comes to the subtler points of interaction and Wizarding culture is where Ron’s experiences prevail….they are two opposites in this way who need each other and this is why their relationship works on a whole

    • Mary

      I’ve been rereading the book series and in CoS it did seem kind of odd how so many of the muggleborns knew of Harry Potter despite knowing nothing of the wizarding world until they came to Hogwarts,

    • Jasmine Lee

      I admit I AM a Ron-lover. Feverishly and adamantly so. However, this is not just my bias and paranoia speaking – his character, over and over again, is ripped apart in the movies. Movie-Ron is an entirely different animal than book-Ron, and for no good reason. A trio is a trio for a reason, it’s not so that the Awesome Duo can have a parroting sidekick to provide some element of humor or relief during dark times.

      • Zack

        Yes, I totally understand your point and I agree. Ron often doesn’t get the treatment he deserves in the films, but I still think he is the glue that holds the three together in a lot of ways. Harry and Hermione have better chemistry than Ron/Hermione and Harry/Ron in the films so I know how frustrated that leaves a lot of fans. I just keep the books and films separate for this very reason. I have my love for the books over here and my love for the movies over there, and that helps it some.

        • Jasmine Lee

          That is a very smart way to look at the books vs movies!

  • Gabrielle Chloe Villanueva

    “If you want to kill Harry you’ll have to kill us too!” – RON

  • Julie

    Although I do wish Ron’s character were more developed in the movies, I like to think the filmmakers were actively trying to break down gender roles/stereotypes. In literature it is a more subtle process (I mean, come on, JANE AUSTEN YOU MAGICAL BEING), but in film, it has to be much more aggressive given the alloted time frame AND cinema audience. So it bothers me from a literary perspective, but not necessarily from a cinematic one.

    • Jasmine Lee

      “actively trying to break down gender roles/stereotypes” — what do you mean? Hermione’s character is already so awesome and badass and HBIC that conflating hers and Ron’s character for the movies does a disservice to both, I think.

      (But YAS. That Austen shout out — you get me. Whee!)

    • lisse

      I disagree completely. Making Hermione into a basic version of the much maligned “Strong Female Character” trope is a bad thing. And, that’s all I see when I look at movie!Hermione who’s stripped of all her edges and flaws to suit Hollywood’s generic tastes. There have been articles written (one by the NYT), as well as tumblr posts, about the stock “Strong Female Character” and why it’s damaging, almost as damaging as the trope it was born in reaction to: “the damsel in distress” trope.

      • Jasmine Lee

        ^^ *praise hands emoji*

  • Elizabeth Crosman

    I’m assuming you meant to say “Ron IS Harry’s confidant…..” and not “Ron is NOT Harry’s confidant…” Maybe an edit is due???

    • No, she was still talking about movie-Ron here.
      <3 MuggleNet Senior Copy Editor

      • Jasmine Lee

        *mwah*

    • Jasmine Lee

      I forgot the “movie” qualifier; I’ve edited the sentence accordingly, for more clarity. Thanks for looking out! 🙂

      (Lordie, I hope you don’t think I didn’t see Ron as Harry’s confidant. /o MY BABY, I LOVE HIIM.)

  • Elizabeth Crosman

    I was going to mention Steve Kloves was a Hermione fan. I agree with you completely. Ron gets the short end of the stick in the movies. And Neville turns in to a house-elf. (Dobby’s lines/actions.)

    • Jane Bloggs

      they only replace Dobby for Neville twice. he did a lot more stuff than just replace Dobby.
      (and the gillyweed thing made more sense for Neville Who studied Herbology)

  • Jane Bloggs

    While I agree with this article overall (although I think the Ootp moment is kind of weak point)

    but I severely disagree with this:

    ‘[If we were to strictly go off movieverse only, then we would see Ron simply as an annoying, comedic sidekick, a cockblock to the burgeoning relationship between Harry and Hermione. Ron is not Harry’s confidant, his guide into the bemusing world of magic, his closest friend who keeps Harry tethered to the nearest thing to a family he knows.’]

    I’m one of the fans that Watched the movies Before I read the books, and I never saw Ron like that.

    I always saw Ron as brave/witty/smart/BFF with Harry & Hermione.

    these are some of the movie scenes where I think movie!Ron was just as good as Book Ron:

    PS:

    Hermione: That’s totally barbaric!

    Ron: That’s wizard’s chess. I see you’ve packed.

    Hermione: See you haven’t.

    Ron: Change of plans. My parents decided to go to Romania to visit my brother, Charlie. He’s studying dragons there!

    Hermione: Good. You can help Harry, then. He’s going to go the library for information on Nicholas Flamel.

    Ron: We’ve looked a hundred times!

    Hermione: Not in the restricted section…

    Ron: I think we’ve had a vad influence on her

    *

    Hermione: Now what do we do?
    Ron: It’s obvious, isn’t it? We’ve got to play our way across the room. All right. Harry, you take the Bishop’s square. Hermione, you’ll be the Queen’s side castle. As for me, I’ll be a knight. {They all take their places.}
    Hermione: What happens now?
    Ron: {aboard a horse.} Well, white moves first, and then…we play.

    Ron: You understand right, Harry. Once I make my move, the Queen will take me…then you’ll be free to check the King.
    Harry: No, Ron! No!
    Hermione: What is it?
    Harry: He’s going to sacrifice himself!
    Hermione: No, Ron, you can’t! {Ron closes his eyes.} There must be another way!
    Ron: {turns to face Hermione.} Do you want to stop Snape or not? Harry, it’s you that has to go on. I know it. Not me, not Hermione, you.

    CoS

    Harry: Ron? Fred? George? What’re you doing here?

    RON: Rescuing you, of course.

    *

    Malfoy: no one asked your opinion, you filthy little mudblood!

    Ron: You’ll pay for that one, Malfoy! Eat slugs!

    *

    GILDEROY LOCKHART: Um, well, yes. Urgent call. Unavoidable. Got to go…

    RON: WHAT ABOUT MY SISTER?!?!

    GILDEROY LOCKHART: Well, as to that — most unfortunate. No one regrets more than I —

    RON: You’re the Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher! You can’t go now!

    PoA:

    Ron making fun of Malfoy pretending to be hurt (“he’s laying it a bit thick isn’t he?)

    Ron’s humorous response at Sir Cadogan (“Yeah, we’ll call you, if we ever need someone mental”)

    GoF

    Ron: Harry you fought dragons, if you can’t get a date, who can?

    Ootp:

    Ron: – What’s going on?

    Seamus: He’s mad, is what’s going on. Do you believe the rubbish he’s come out with about You-Know-Who?

    Ron: Yeah. I do. Has anyone else got a problem with Harry?

    *

    Ron: You all right?

    Harry: Fine.

    Ron: Seamus was bang out of order, mate. But he’ll come through, you’ll see.

    *

    *sees harry’s must not tell lies’ scar

    Ron: Bloody hell, Harry. The woman’s torturing you. If the parents knew about this…

    *

    Zacharias smith: Why?

    Ron: Why? Cause Voldemort is back, you toss pot!

    *praises Harry*

    Third year, he fought off, about a hundred Dementors at once.

    *
    (After Umbridge catches the DA)
    Ron: Harry. You did everything you could. No one could win against that old hag.

    *

    (Ron & co escape the inquistory squad*

    Hermione: How’d you get away?

    Ginny: uking Pastilles. It wasn’t pretty.

    Ron: Told them I was hungry, wanted some sweets. They told me to bugger off and ate the lot themselves.

    Hermione: That was clever, Ron.

    Ron: Has been known to happen.

    *

    Ron to Harry: Maybe you don’t have to do this all by yourself, mate.

    *

    HBP

    (seeing Malfoy in knocturn alley)

    Ron: don’t you find it strange that draco and his mommy are a skulking around?:

    DH

    (Ron convinces Harry not to go on his own):

    RON: Going somewhere?

    HARRY: No one else is going to die. Not for me.

    RON
    For you? You think Madeye died

    for you? You think George took

    that curse for you? You may be

    the Chosen One, mate, but this is

    a whole lot bigger than that.

    HARRY

    Come with me.

    RON

    And leave Hermione? Are you mad?

    We wouldn’t last two days without

    her.

    ….

    RON

    Tonight’s not the night, mate.

    You’d only be doing him a favor.

    RON

    Do you think he knows?

    I mean, they’re bits of his soul,

    the Horcruxes. Bits of him. When

    Dumbledore destroyed the ring and

    you destroyed Tom Riddle’s diary

    all those years ago — he must’ve

    felt something right?

    *

    (at the cafe)

    RON

    This is Dolohov. I recognize him

    from the wanted posters.

    So what do we do with you, huh?

    Kill us if it was turned round,wouldn’t you?

    *
    (Ron seeing bellatrix about to kill Hermione*

    Like HELL!

    (Ron&Hermione meet back with Harry:

    Ron: Hermione and I were thinking,

    it doesn’t matter if we find the Horcrux.

    Harry: What do you mean?

    Hermione: Unless we can destroy it.

    Ron: So, we were thinking…

    Hermione: Well, Ron was thinking, it was Ron’s idea. It was completely brilliant

    Ron: You destroyed Tom Riddle’s diary with a Basilisk fang, right?

    Well, me and Hermione did remember
    where we might find one.

    *

    (later)

    Ron:

    Bloody hell!

    We’ll never find him on this.

    Hermione:

    Here he is!

    – He’s just…

    He just vanished.

    I’m sure I saw it.

    Ron:

    Maybe he’s gone to the Room of Requirement.

    It doesn’t show up on the map, does it?

    You said that last year.

    Hermione:
    That’s right, I did.

    Ron:
    then Let’s go.

    Hermione:
    Brilliant!

    *

    (meet back with harry who is having a vision:

    Ron:

    Look inside him, Harry.

    Find out where he is,

    if you find him, we can find the snake.

    And we can end this!

    so yeah Movie!Ron had moments where he was Great and amazing too. Not as much as the book, but he still did.

    • Jasmine Lee

      Nod nod nod. Yes, you’re absolutely right. All those scenes are amazing Ron scenes. It’s just…it’s unfortunate that we are able to count on all of our fingers and toes those filmic instances, instead of being able to describe movie!Ron, overall, as a hero in his own right. Most of these examples seem like exceptions, when we, as the book readers, know that they’re not examples, they’re all manifestations of awesome, complicated, well-developed Ron.

      • Jane Bloggs

        That is true and unfortunate, and something we should definitely complain about. However I still maintain that these good moments should be considered in general by fandom, as opposed to just brushing them aside and generalizing movie Ron as ‘useless’ ‘Ruined’ ‘book Ron worst nightmare’

        if anything we should be thankful to Rupert Grint who managed to make this moments so good so as to not let the director/scriptwriter Genuinely Ruin Ron.

  • Emmanuelle

    “…does nothing except satisfy Harry/Hermione shippers”: that’s enough for me.

    • Jasmine Lee

      ? Is that a bad “enough for me”? Or a good one?

  • guest

    I ADORE THIS POST!

    JUSTICE FOR RON!

  • Mary

    While it wasn’t a Hermoine stealing Ron’s line moment, I think the most unforgivable thing they’ve done to Ron was in Deathly Hallows Part One where they replaced Ron’s emotional breakdown after destroying the locket with a one-liner. I mean so much of DH was so deep and the movie replaced nearly all those important moments with very lame attempts at comedy. I can’t believe they let Kloves write for so many of the films.

    • Jasmine Lee

      DON’T. EVEN. get me started on that whole fucking scene. JESUS. All of DH, Ron was given a disservice. WHY did they tone down his reaction to Hermione getting tortured? WHY did they take out the line where Harry assures him all he and Hermione have are platonic feelings? WHY WHY WHY KEYSLAM.

    • Dawn Kelley

      It’s easy to blame Kloves entirely, but to an extent, a hired on writer to adapt is not like someone who’s a wonder kid writer left alone in there room to etch out there independently thought of brilliant idea and then shoot it the way they want as an indie filmmaker. The studio will REQUEST changes once drafts are written, they will request changes as it’s being shot (directors also change text – because they might think it makes more sense for another character to say/do a thing). Then after it’s shot and the studio looks at the first cut, they may request re-shoots and changes, then test audience the crap out of it and request more changes that the hired on writer has to do no matter how he feels about it. Kloves was hired to adapt someone else’s work. Even if he wrote a brilliant adaptation, with Ron retaining all his lines, if someone at the Studio says “I think it would sound better if Hermione says it.” He HAS to re-write it that way. So while everyone likes to throw Kloves under the bus as if every word he wrote made it to the final film, it’s completely possible that is not the case.

  • ZaFl

    What an amazing, and exceptionally well-written, essay! I say amazing because I was flabbergasted to read all these examples. I read each book before seeing the film, and have read all the books and seen all the films several times by now; yet even though the books and movies were discussed at length in the HP book club we had in my city, most of these changes never came up. The one scene I did notice with dismay was the ending of HPB, which seemed to be a broad hint (to non-readers) that Harry & Hermione would get together. As for Ron seeming, throughout the movies, to be such a comical sidekick and completely without merit as a romantic interest for Hermione, I attributed that to the direction and to Rupert Grint’s natural talent for such a portrayal. Anyhow, thanks for this detailed info, which I will share with others.

    • Jane Bloggs

      ?!?!?

      I might be reading your statement wrong, but it seems to me you’re implying that it’s Rupert’s fault for Ron being ‘comical sidekick and completely without merit as a romantic interest for Hermione’

      which I’m not sorry to say, if that’s that case, you’re wrong on both accounts

      Rupert Grint had nothing to do with Ron more emphasis as a ‘comedic character’ it was the scriptwriter that kept emphasizing it.

      Rupert’s own opinion on what kind of person Ron couldn’t be more different:

      ‘But, the truth is that Ron is my hero. He’s always there for his friends – sometimes belligerently, but there nevertheless. And no matter how scared he may be, he will put aside his fears to support and protect the people he loves. To me, that represents true courage.’

      that doesn’t seem like someone who wants to portray Ron as just the comic relief and ‘having no merit’ as Hermione romantic interest. Quite the opposite in fact.

      but Rupert didn’t got a say and what Ron got to do in the movies, the director/Scriptwriter did. and we already stablished that Kloves did not liked Ron.

      as for the ‘No merit as Hermione’s love interest’ that’s rubbish too.
      sure it got severely downplayed, while Harry’s potential as one be over inflated.

      but Ron is still the one that stand up for Hermione repeatedly in the movies

      Who stands up for Hermione when Malfoy calls her a mudblood? Ron still does

      who looks the more dismayed when Hermione is petrified? Ron still does.

      who keep looking at Hermione (and viceversa) with the uttermost love in his eyes, on several occasions (ex. Bill/Fleur wedding) Ron still does.

      who defends Hermione against Kreacher’s slurs? Ron still does.

      Who is the first one that jumps to action when Bellatrix is about to kill Hermione? Ron still does.

      the same can be said about Hermione’s reactions to Ron.

      so I’m sorry if the Harry/Hermione shippers in your book club has put you down, but the fact remains that even downplayed, Ron is still good and still worthy of Hermione in the movies, despite Kloves obvious meddling.

      (if you want to know more examples of Good! movie Ron moments- look at my other comment in this post)

      • ZaFl

        Actors bring their own talents and also their particular appearance to a film role. Physical appearance is less important on stage, but unavoidable on screen. I thought from the first movie that “Ron” did not look like a romantic love interest, but admired the actor’s comical facial
        expressions, which reminded me of some of the “sidekicks” in old movies. Reading the first book, I would never have predicted a Ron/Hermione
        romance, and was surprised that some people predicted that (as I heard on an NPR program). Later, I became curious about the urge to write fan fiction, as for most of my life, there was no such thing, and readers just accepted what the author wrote as “truth.” So I led a roundtable discussion at Infinitus, a HP con in 2010, on the topic, and it was interesting to see dozens of women present who felt compelled to make up an alternate story with Hermione paired up with someone other than Ron. However, since Ron is destined for Hermione in the books, I would have been happy to see his character on screen made more, rather than less, smart and bold.
        P.S. No need to disparage the book club; there were no “shippers” of any type there, only thoughtful readers. I learned about “shipping” at HP cons.

        • Jane Bloggs

          ah. my apologies in regard to my comment regarding the book club. I missunderstood your comment and thought there were shippers there giving Ron a hard time. thanks for clarifying.

          as for Rupert as Ron and the traditional romantic lead. well you’re not wrong, but that’s what great about Ron/Hermione. It wasn’t the traditional romantic pair, and I thought that refreshing (and realistic- after all girls can and do go for the less strikingly handsome guy for the more average but loyal and stable one, a lot of times)

          Rupert Does have great comedic timing, I won’t deny that, and I enjoy it. But he did have plenty of smart/leading man type moments throughout the films, and Even when they were sadly overshadowed by the ‘comedic’ moments, that doesn’t mean they weren’t there

          yes, movie!Ron was made much more comedic ‘sidekick’ than in the books, but people (not you but general) saying that’s all he was in the movies, are doing Rupert a disservice. because like I said he Did have great serious scenes in the movies and those should Not be dismissed just because they were few and far in between.

          • Ana Melo

            I agree with you, the writting of movies may have screwed up, but the actors brought up the real characters in the books with what was given by the script, to me shows the problem is majorly the script and the directing of the movies.
            Yes, I do have serious troubles with Steve Kloves.

      • Jasmine Lee

        ‘But, the truth is that Ron is my hero. He’s always there for his friends – sometimes belligerently, but there nevertheless. And no matter how scared he may be, he will put aside his fears to support and protect the people he loves. To me, that represents true courage.’

        ^ THAT. QUOTE. :B omggggg Rupert is a DOLL. GOSH. I LOVE HIM SO HARD.

        • Jane Bloggs

          I adore that quote. It’s my go-to-quote when people say movie Ron is only ‘useless’

    • Jasmine Lee

      Thank you so much! I thrive on the validation of my writing, hahah, so your comment was very happily received. 🙂

    • Dawn Kelley

      I attribute this more to studios not knowing how to handle Ron beyond checking off there normal check boxes, Hero, check – Harry, nerd-friend (as in the source of all knowledge) Hermione – check, and comedy, Ron – check. Because on the flip side, Harry could be just as much an idiot boy as Ron sometimes. He also was great for a good one liner, especially with his cousin. The moments in the book where Harry got a good poke in all went away, leaving him the serious one and Ron there to be the laugh track. Daniel himself seems like a guy that loves to do a little goofing around. But Harry got very little time to be just a boy goofing around with his best bloke. In the crafting of Hollywood boxes, if Harry was the serious hero, Ron had to be the comic relief. Because layers is just not a thing they do well. And, of course, if Hermione was the smart one, absolutely no one else could have a thought as intelligent or more intelligent than hers. Which, at times, made no sense. As smart as Hermione was, it was book knowledge. She was the kind of stuff you know from research. Ron, the pureblood, was the one who had the knowledge from spending all of his life in a community Harry and Hermione didn’t know existed for the first 12 years of there life. Often in the books, he knew a lot neither Harry or Hermione knew just because of that and they took all of that away. Which is sad.

  • GIRL. 100% agree. You said everything I wanted before I even knew I wanted it. I always HATED the CoS scene and the Deathly Hallows “Are Harry and Hermione going to kiss?” scene in particular, and as a Ron fangirl, something about movie-Ron always bothered me, but I couldn’t place it so analytically. These examples are so clear, and I will continue championing book-Ron to people who have only seen the movies.

    For the record, it was swine flu (I updated the article).

    • Jasmine Lee

      Thanks, Felicia! 🙂

      Yes! I mean, movie-Ron has his upsides – e.g. Rupert Grint and Rupert Grint’s awesome facial expression – but he’s so underdeveloped as opposed to the books, it makes my heart hurt.

      • Martina Cafferatta

        I think if they had given him the lines, he would have done an outstanding job!!!!

        I am a Ron fan girl but I am a Hermione fan too!! I think I just like the book in all senses… Harry too seems too dumb in the movies sometimes!

        (The other day I was watching Sorcerer’s Stone and thought it was cut but then I realised that the scenes I thought were cut, were part of my imagination while reading the books! hahaha

  • Rachel

    the biggest change (i.e. the one that pisses me off the most) is from PoA when book Ron stands on his broken leg in front of harry and tells Sirius that he’d have to kill him to get to Harry, but the movie gives Hermione the line instead

    • Jasmine Lee

      *tears out hair* *falls to knees* WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY. Dammit, movie-Ron was fucking useless throughout PoA.

    • Dawn Kelley

      Yes!!!!! So angry about that. Like it’s the one change that punches me in the gut with anger EVERY time.

  • Lovelle

    i swear! the movies really focused more on the events rather than the characters…. but this article is definitely right. i love Ron and Rupert had an amazing portrayal of him and could’ve been phenomenal as the book-Ron.

  • jeann

    i’ve been disappointed with short-shaft given to Ron too. i think the movie decision makers wanted to enhance Hermione’s role to appeal to the female audience so that girls would feel more included and to make Hermione a role-model. in doing so, they completely emasculated Ron. too bad, in all their creativity, find a better way to achieve that goal.

  • Ewa

    Great post. As much as I like Hermione, I’m not keen on some changes that were introduced to her character in the film. We all know she’s smart and talented, but in the film she’s just too smart and too talented. IMHO, she becomes the film’s main protagonist – not Harry, but her. I’m myself a Harry fan so, just as you are bothered with Hermione stealing Ron’s lines, I’m not happy with the fact that she steals also Harry’s show where she isn’t really supposed to.

    Film Harry would be hopeles without Hermione. In the books, it’s clearly said that she’s got problems with producing a patronus and it’s also apparent that Harry would beat her in a duel/defence against the dark arts. She also has this tendency in the book to panic a bit in stressful situations and it’s Harry who’s able to maintain his cool best when things get rough. Meanwhile, the film Hermione rules it all and is totally the best in everything. She also says some smart lines that were originally Dumbledore’s (sorry, I don’t remember the exact examples now, but I’m sure this is the case, just as it’s the case with her “stealing” Ron’s lines) and she’s esentially the brain behind it all. Best example here would be the escape from Gringotts on the dragon. Hermione was afraid of flying for God’s sake, so there was no way she could come up with a plan to fly on a dragon – it was all Harry’s idea. But in the film? Of course – Harry has no clue what to do and Hermione has to save him.

    Thank you for the post!

    • Jasmine Lee

      Ooooh, I like what you said about book!Hermione having a tendency to panic and book!Harry maintaining (for the most part) his cool when things get rough. So, so true. Like, book!Harry IS hopeless in some parts of the series, and he is fully aware that others are always saving his butt and coming in at the nick of time, but he’s an accomplished wizard in his own right. He has both luck and skill in the books. In the films…not so much.

      Thank you for liking my article! 🙂

    • Emily

      “Fear of a name increases fear of the thing itself” – originally Dumbledore’s line I think!

  • gfohkloves

    You forgot the one I will recite till the day I die “If you want to kill Harry, you’ll have to kill us.” (Prisoner of Azkaban). This direct line was taken from Ron and given to Hermione.

    I will never stop resenting Kloves, movie!Hermione, or H/Hr for this. I’m a multi-shipper for everything except H/Hr because of this nonsense. H/Hr is notp level.

    • Karan Chand

      Exactly.. This scene is one of the main reasons I hate the HP movies (POA and beyond) as much as I love the books

  • Dawn Kelley

    The biggest film problem was that they thought Hermione had to be Super!Hermione to make her a “hero”. Book Hermione is HUMAN, she has her talents, but freaking out and loosing her composure, ESPECIALLY under pressure is a thing. For example, Ron fought Draco in Book 1 by choice (not in the movie) in defense of a friend (Neville), Hermione slapped Draco in book 3 (a punch in the movie) ONLY because she was highly stressed and overworked and trying to be the superhuman she wasn’t, completely loss in the movie. In the book, the trio is a trinity of strengths and weaknesses. In the movie, Hermione is a super human girl with little to no human failings. Her insecurities balance her in the book and make her real and more likable.

    • Sirek

      Hermione actually slapped Draco in defense of Hagrid, because Malfoy was talking ugly about him and Hermione got mad because of what he said.

      • Dawn Kelley

        She got mad, but mad Hermione only slapped him because it was an annoyance on top of stress. Much like attacking Snape in PoA, there were extenuating circumstances that pulled her out of her normal control points that influenced her to “be the good one”.

  • Brittanie Weil

    I’m a complete Ron fangirl. It’s not line stealing,but it’s a big disservice to Hermione’s complexity. They delete almost all of Hermione’s faults. In POA she is a complete twat to Lavender after Blinky dies just to prove her point about Trelawney. This demonstrates how dedicated Hermione is to proving she’s always right even if it hurts those around her. She does this several times throughout multiple books. It never comes up in the movies. Even instances where she proven wrong.

  • Aaron C

    Book Ron is also a strong character who defends the others and that is taken from him for the most part (with a few exceptions – e.g. cursing Malfoy in CoS).

    The moment that stands out to me is in PoA when Snape teaches DADA in Lupin’s place and Snape calls Hermoine a know-it-all. Movie Ron sheepishly says Snape has a point. Book Ron “…said loudly, ‘You asked us a question and she knows the answer! Why ask if you don’t want to be told?'”

    His individual strength, which benefits the trio, is lost in his being relegated to the comedic sidekick, which is such a shame.

    • Kelly Caccamo

      Yes, perfect example!

    • MFD

      Book Ron is actually much funnier than movie Ron. And movie Ron is portrayed as kind of a bumbling idiot that’s only there for laughs.

  • Paul Leingang

    Excellent post!! I’ve always felt that the movies didn’t understand the characters. Everyone clearly agrees that the trio was severely misrepresented in the movie portrayals, but even other characters were ruined. I hated the movie Luna, they made her seem drunk all the time! Don’t even get me started on Michael Gabom’s depiction of Dumbledore. He completely missed the essence of the character and the lighthearded and eccentric quirks during serious times (Dumbledore and Harry in the broomshed outside the Weasleys in the 6th book is one of my favorite moments between them). They also completely missed the relationship between Harry and Dumbledore.

    Anyway, to this post: my least favorite movie Ron moment is when they are trapped in Malfoy Manor and hermione is being tortured. Movie Ron is calm!!!! WHAT!?!? He’s supposed to be freaking out!! Pounding on the door and screaming for Hermione!! This does such a disservice to their relationship and Ron’s character. This is when we really see how much Ron loves Hermione.

  • Hermione as portrayed in the films is one of the best thing to happen to generations of girls (and boys) for years to come. The film portrayal makes a lot of things OK for a girl to be and really aids, in different ways, the book in demonstrating the complexities and varieties of relationships that people can have and how life can take different paths.

  • Hannah

    Also in chamber of secrets movie when Hermione said that even in the wizarding world hearing voices isn’t a good sign whereas in the book it was Ron who said it in the book seeing as Hermione wouldn’t know that since she grew up a Muggle.

    And Prisoner of Azkaban movie when Hermione said if you want to kill Harry you’ll have to kill us too when it was Ron who said it in the book which also makes it look like Hermione cares more about Harry and like you said seemed like she was more of Harry’s confidant.

    Ron is one of my fave characters and I hate some of the way they treated him in the movies, I love his friendship with Harry & they don’t do it justice just like in the book, Harry and Hermione missed Ron a lot when he left in Deathly Hallows but instead they made them dance because they the director loved Harry & Hermione & tried to force them. It does make me angry the way they treated him & always put him in the back of Harry & Hermione & make him look like a fool when he knows more about the wizarding world than Harry & Hermione.