“Am I a Feminist?”: Evanna Lynch Pens Wonderful Essay for New Collection

Evanna Lynch has always stood up in the fight for animal rights, most recently speaking with All Animals to encourage fans to do the same. Lynch’s views on feminism have not always been as clear, as she herself wonderfully articulates in an essay published in Feminists Don’t Wear Pink and Other Lies: Amazing Women on What the F-Word Means to Them, which is curated by Scarlett Curtis. The essay was shared online by the Irish Times and it is an amazingly personal look into Lynch’s beliefs and ideals.

In her essay, Lynch describes her experiences with feminism and how other women have influenced her views.

 ‘Am I a feminist?’ I wonder. ‘Obviously!’ my mind counters quickly, but there is an annoying, niggling thought that I need to be doing more to show it.

Lynch describes her experiences with femininity and her younger thought that in order to be smart, one had to be quirky, “because quirky girls had thoughts, were interesting.”

When describing her time in school, Lynch tells a story of the time she dressed as Harry Potter as a “silent, ironic protest against the fishnet stockings and streakily applied tans of [her] less censorious peers.”

I thought I was hilarious and mature, but when an attractive boy glanced at me across the room, with my orange juice and smudgy lightning-scar, and shook his head in disgust, I knew what he meant. But I remained confused.

This extremely personal essay is a wonderful exploration of what it means to be a feminist and how one may or may not show it outright. Lynch ends her essay by describing her feminist icons, whom she admits are “not the classic ones.”

I’ll be more like JK Rowling, calmly reading her new novel to a library, letting the writing speak for itself and wearing bright red lipstick and a jacket so glorious and spangled with sequins that when she hugged me she left a tiny scratch.

Lynch is a wonderful writer, and her essay speaks for itself. You can purchase Feminists Don’t Wear Pink and Other Lies here, and you can read her entire essay in the Irish Times.